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Daniel 2:37

    Daniel 2:37 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou, O king, art a king of kings: for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You, O king, are a king of kings: for the God of heaven has given you a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou, O king, art king of kings, unto whom the God of heaven hath given the kingdom, the power, and the strength, and the glory;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You, O King, king of kings, to whom the God of heaven has given the kingdom, the power, and the strength, and the glory,

    Webster's Revision

    Thou, O king, art king of kings, unto whom the God of heaven hath given the kingdom, the power, and the strength, and the glory;

    World English Bible

    You, O king, are king of kings, to whom the God of heaven has given the kingdom, the power, and the strength, and the glory;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou, O king, art king of kings, unto whom the God of heaven hath given the kingdom, the power, and the strength, and the glory;

    Definitions for Daniel 2:37

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 2:37

    The God of heaven - Not given by thy own gods, nor acquired by thy own skill and prowess; it is a Divine gift.

    Power - To rule this kingdom.

    And strength - To defend it against all foes.

    And glory - Great honor and dignity.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 2:37

    Thou, O King, art a king of kings - The phrase "king of kings" is a Hebraism, to denote a supreme monarch, or one who has other kings under him as tributary, Ezra 7:12; Ezekiel 26:7. As such it is applied by way of eminence to the Son of God, in Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:16. As here used, it means that Nebuchadnezzar ruled over tributary kings and princes, or that he was the most eminent of the kings of the earth. The scepter which he swayed was, in fact, extended over many nations that were once independent kingdoms, and the title here conferred on him was not one that was designed to flatter the monarch, but was a simple statement of what was an undoubted truth. Daniel would not withhold any title that was in accordance with reality, as he did not withhold any communication in accordance with reality that was adapted to humble the monarch.

    For the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom ... - At the same time that Daniel gave him a title which might in itself have ministered to the pride of the monarch, he is careful to remind him that he held this title in virtue of no wisdom or power of his own. It was the true God who had conferred on him the sovereignty of these extensive realms, and it was one of the designs of this vision to show him that he held his power at his will, and that at his pleasure he could cause it to pass away. It was the forgetfulness of this, and the pride resulting from that forgetfulness, which led to the melancholy calamity which befel this haughty monarch, as recorded in Daniel 4.