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Deuteronomy 8:4

    Deuteronomy 8:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thy raiment waxed not old upon thee, neither did thy foot swell, these forty years.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Your raiment waxed not old on you, neither did your foot swell, these forty years.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thy raiment waxed not old upon thee, neither did thy foot swell, these forty years.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Through all these forty years your clothing did not get old or your feet become tired.

    Webster's Revision

    Thy raiment waxed not old upon thee, neither did thy foot swell, these forty years.

    World English Bible

    Your clothing didn't grow old on you, neither did your foot swell, these forty years.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thy raiment waxed not old upon thee, neither did thy foot swell, these forty years.

    Definitions for Deuteronomy 8:4

    Raiment - Clothing; apparel; covering.

    Clarke's Commentary on Deuteronomy 8:4

    Thy raiment waxed not old, etc. - The plain meaning of this much-tortured text appears to me to be this: "God so amply provided for them all the necessaries of life, that they never were obliged to wear tattered garments, nor were their feet injured for lack of shoes or sandals." If they had carvers, engravers, silversmiths, and jewelers among them, as plainly appears from the account we have of the tabernacle and its utensils, is it to be wondered at if they also had habit and sandal makers, etc., etc., as we are certain they had weavers, embroiderers, and such like? And the traffic which we may suppose they carried on with the Moabites, or with travelling hordes of Arabians, doubtless supplied them with the materials; though, as they had abundance of sheep and neat cattle, they must have had much of the materials within themselves. It is generally supposed that God, by a miracle, preserved their clothes from wearing out: but if this sense be admitted, it will require, not one miracle, but a chain of the most successive and astonishing miracles ever wrought, to account for the thing; for as there were not less than 600,000 males born in the wilderness, it would imply, that the clothes of the infant grew up with the increase of his body to manhood, which would require a miracle to be continually wrought on every thread, and on every particle of matter of which that thread was composed. And this is not all; it would imply that the clothes of the parent became miraculously lessened to fit the body of the child, with whose growth they were again to stretch and grow, etc. No such miraculous interference was necessary.

    Barnes' Notes on Deuteronomy 8:4

    They had clothes, it would seem, in abundance (compare Exodus 12:34-35) at the beginning of the 40 years; and during those years they had many sheep and oxen, and so must have had much material for clothing always at command. No doubt also they carried on a traffic in these, as in other commodities, with the Moabites and the nomadic tribes of the desert. Such ordinary supplies must not be shut out of consideration, even if they were on occasions supplemented by extraordinary providences of God, as was undoubtedly the case with their food.