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Ephesians 6:7

    Ephesians 6:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    With good will doing service, as to the Lord, and not to men:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    With good will doing service, as to the Lord, and not to men:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    with good will doing service, as unto the Lord, and not unto men:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Doing your work readily, as to the Lord, and not to men:

    Webster's Revision

    with good will doing service, as unto the Lord, and not unto men:

    World English Bible

    with good will doing service, as to the Lord, and not to men;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    with good will doing service, as unto the Lord, and not unto men:

    Clarke's Commentary on Ephesians 6:7

    With good will - Μετ' ευνοιας· With cheerfulness; do not take up your service as a cross, or bear it as a burden; but take it as coming in the order of God's providence, and a thing that is pleasing to him.

    Barnes' Notes on Ephesians 6:7

    As to the Lord, and not to men - That is, he should regard his lot in life as having been ordered by Divine Providence for some wise and good purpose; and until he may be permitted to enjoy his liberty in a quiet and peaceable manner (notes, 1 Corinthians 7:21), he should perform his duties with fidelity, and feel that he was rendering acceptable service to God. This would reconcile him to much of the hardships of his lot. The feeling that "God" has ordered the circumstances of our lives, and that he has some wise and good ends to answer by it, makes us contented there; though we may feel that our fellowman may be doing us injustice. It was this principle that made the martyrs so patient under the wrongs done them by people; and this may make even a slave patient and submissive under the wrongs of a master. But let not a master think, because a pious slave shows this spirit, that, therefore, the slave feels that the master is right in withholding his freedom; nor let him suppose, because religion requires the slave to be submissive and obedient, that, therefore, it approves of what the master does. It does this no more than it sanctioned the conduct of Nero and Mary, because religion required the martyrs to be unresisting, and to allow themselves to be led to the stake. A conscientious slave may find happiness in submitting to God, and doing his will, just as a conscientious martyr may. But this does not sanction the wrong, either of the slave-owner or of the persecutor.

    Wesley's Notes on Ephesians 6:7

    6:7 Unto the Lord, and not to men - That is, rather than to men; and by making every action of common life a sacrifice to God; having an eye to him in all things, even as if there were no other master.