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Exodus 12:34

    Exodus 12:34 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneadingtroughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading troughs being bound up in their clothes on their shoulders.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading-troughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the people took their bread-paste before it was leavened, putting their basins in their clothing on their backs.

    Webster's Revision

    And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading-troughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.

    World English Bible

    The people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading troughs being bound up in their clothes on their shoulders.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneadingtroughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.

    Definitions for Exodus 12:34

    Bound - Landmark.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 12:34

    The people took their dough before it was leavened, etc. - There was no time now to make any regular preparation for their departure, such was the universal hurry and confusion. The Israelites could carry but little of their household utensils with them; but some, such as they kneaded their bread and kept their meal in, they were obliged to carry with them. The kneading troughs of the Arabs are comparatively small wooden bowls, which, after kneading their bread in, serve them as dishes out of which they eat their victuals. And as to these being bound up in their clothes, no more may be intended than their wrapping them up in their long, loose garments, or in what is still used among the Arabs, and called hykes, which is a long kind of blanket, something resembling a highland plaid, in which they often carry their provision, wrap themselves by day, and sleep at night. Dr. Shaw has been particular in his description of this almost entire wardrobe of an Arab. He says they are of different sizes and of different qualities, but generally about six yards in length, and five or six feet broad. He supposes that what we call Ruth's veil, Ruth 3:15, was a hyke, and that the same is to be understood of the clothes of the Israelites mentioned in this verse. See his Travels, p. 224, 4th edition.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 12:34

    Kneadingtroughs - (Compare the margin and Deuteronomy 28:5). The troughs were probably small wooden bowls in which the cakes when baked were preserved for use. The Hebrews used their outer garment, or mantle, in the same way as the Bedouins at present, who make a bag of the voluminous folds of their burnous. See Ruth 3:15; 2 Kings 4:39.

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 12:34

    12:34 Their kneading - troughs - Or rather, their lumps of paste unleavened.