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Exodus 20:2

    Exodus 20:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I am the LORD your God, which have brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I am Jehovah thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I am the Lord your God who took you out of the land of Egypt, out of the prison-house.

    Webster's Revision

    I am Jehovah thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    World English Bible

    "I am Yahweh your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I am the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 20:2

    I am the Lord thy God - יהוה אלהיך Yehovah eloheycha. On the word Jehovah, which we here translate Lord, see Clarke's note on Genesis 2:4, and see Clarke's note on Exodus 6:3. And on the word Elohim, here translated God, see Clarke's note on Genesis 1:1. It is worthy of remark that each individual is addressed here, and not the people collectively, though they are all necessarily included; that each might feel that he was bound for himself to hear and do all these words. Moses labored to impress this personal interest on the people's minds, when he said, Deuteronomy 5:3, Deuteronomy 5:4 : "The Lord made this covenant with us, even us, who are all of us here alive this day." Brought thee out of the land of Egypt, etc. - And by this very thing have proved myself to be superior to all gods, unlimited in power, and most gracious as well as fearful in operation. This is the preface or introduction, but should not be separated from the commandment. Therefore, -

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 20:2

    Which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage - It has been asked: Why, on this occasion, was not the Lord rather proclaimed as "the Creator of Heaven and Earth"? The answer is, Because the Ten Commandments were at this time addressed by Yahweh not merely to human creatures, but to the people whom He had redeemed, to those who had been in bondage, but were now free men Exodus 6:6-7; Exodus 19:5. The commandments are expressed in absolute terms. They are not sanctioned by outward penalties, as if for slaves, but are addressed at once to the conscience, as for free men. The well-being of the nation called for the infliction of penalties, and therefore statutes were passed to punish offenders who blasphemed the name of Yahweh, who profaned the Sabbath, or who committed murder or adultery. (See Leviticus 18:24-30 note.) But these penal statutes were not to be the ground of obedience for the true Israelite according to the covenant. He was to know Yahweh as his Redeemer, and was to obey him as such (Compare Romans 13:5).

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 20:2

    20:2 I am the Lord thy God - Herein, God asserts his own authority to enact this law; and proposeth himself as the sole object of that religious worship which is enjoined in the four first commandments. They are here bound to obedience. Because God is the Lord, Jehovah, self - existent, independent, eternal, and the fountain of all being and power; therefore he has an incontestable right to command us. He was their God; a God in covenant with them; their God by their own consent. He had brought them out of the land of Egypt - Therefore they were bound in gratitude to obey him, because he had brought them out of a grievous slavery into a glorious liberty. By redeeming them, he acquired a farther right to rule them; they owed their service to him, to whom they owed their freedom. And thus, Christ, having rescued us out of the bondage of sin, is entitled to the best service we can do him. The four first commandments, concern our duty to God (commonly called the first - table.) It was fit those should be put first, because man had a Maker to love before he had a neighbour to love, and justice and charity are then only acceptable to God when they flow from the principles of piety.