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Exodus 22:26

    Exodus 22:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If thou at all take thy neighbour's raiment to pledge, thou shalt deliver it unto him by that the sun goeth down:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If you at all take your neighbor's raiment to pledge, you shall deliver it to him by that the sun goes down:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If thou at all take thy neighbor's garment to pledge, thou shalt restore it unto him before the sun goeth down:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If ever you take your neighbour's clothing in exchange for the use of your money, let him have it back before the sun goes down:

    Webster's Revision

    If thou at all take thy neighbor's garment to pledge, thou shalt restore it unto him before the sun goeth down:

    World English Bible

    If you take your neighbor's garment as collateral, you shall restore it to him before the sun goes down,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If thou at all take thy neighbour's garment to pledge, thou shalt restore it unto him by that the sun goeth down:

    Definitions for Exodus 22:26

    Raiment - Clothing; apparel; covering.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 22:26

    If thou - take thy neighbor's raiment to pledge - It seems strange that any pledge should be taken which must be so speedily restored; but it is very likely that the pledge was restored by night only, and that he who pledged it brought it back to his creditor next morning. The opinion of the rabbins is, that whatever a man needed for the support of life, he had the use of it when absolutely necessary, though it was pledged. Thus he had the use of his working tools by day, but he brought them to his creditor in the evening. His hyke, which serves an Arab as a plaid does a Highlander, (See Clarke's note on Exodus 12:34), was probably the raiment here referred to: it is a sort of coarse blanket, about six yards long, and five or six feet broad, which an Arab always carries with him, and on which he sleeps at night, it being his only substitute for a bed. As the fashions in the east scarcely ever change, it is very likely that the raiment of the Israelites was precisely the same with that of the modern Arabs, who live in the very same desert in which the Hebrews were when this law was given. How necessary it was to restore the hyke to a poor man before the going down of the sun, that he might have something to repose on, will appear evident from the above considerations. At the same time, the returning it daily to the creditor was a continual acknowledgment of the debt, and served instead of a written acknowledgment or bond; as we may rest assured that writing, if practiced at all before the giving of the law, was not common: but it is most likely that it did not exist.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 22:26

    The law regarding pledges is expanded, Deuteronomy 24:6, Deuteronomy 24:10-13.