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Exodus 23:6

    Exodus 23:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou shalt not wrest the judgment of thy poor in his cause.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You shall not wrest the judgment of your poor in his cause.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou shalt not wrest the justice due to thy poor in his cause.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let no wrong decisions be given in the poor man's cause.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou shalt not wrest the justice due to thy poor in his cause.

    World English Bible

    "You shall not deny justice to your poor people in their lawsuits.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou shalt not wrest the judgment of thy poor in his cause.

    Definitions for Exodus 23:6

    Wrest - To wrench; to torture by twisting.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 23:6

    Thou shalt not wrest the judgment of thy poor - Thou shalt neither countenance him in his crimes, nor condemn him in his righteousness. See Exodus 23:5, Exodus 23:7.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 23:6

    Four precepts evidently addressed to those in authority as judges:

    (a) To do justice to the poor. Comparing Exodus 23:6 with Exodus 23:3, it was the part of the judge to defend the poor against the oppression of the rich, and the part of the witness to take care lest his feelings of natural pity should tempt him to falsify evidence.

    (b) To be cautious of inflicting capital punishment on one whose guilt was not clearly proved. A doubtful case was rather to be left to God Himself, who would "not justify the wicked," nor suffer him to go unpunished though he might be acquitted by an earthly tribunal. Exodus 23:7.

    (c) To take no bribe or present which might in any way pervert judgment Exodus 23:8; compare Numbers 16:15; 1 Samuel 12:3; Acts 26:26.

    (d) To vindicate the rights of the stranger Exodus 23:9 - rather, the foreigner. (Exodus 20:10 note.) This verse is a repetition of Exodus 22:21, but the precept is there addressed to the people at large, while it is here addressed to the judges in reference to their official duties. The caution was perpetually necessary. Compare Ezekiel 22:7; Malachi 3:5. The word rendered "heart" is more strictly "soul," and would be better represented here by feelings.