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Exodus 25:18

    Exodus 25:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And thou shalt make two cherubims of gold, of beaten work shalt thou make them, in the two ends of the mercy seat.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And you shall make two cherubim of gold, of beaten work shall you make them, in the two ends of the mercy seat.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And thou shalt make two cherubim of gold; of beaten work shalt thou make them, at the two ends of the mercy-seat.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And at the two ends of the cover you are to make two winged ones of hammered gold,

    Webster's Revision

    And thou shalt make two cherubim of gold; of beaten work shalt thou make them, at the two ends of the mercy-seat.

    World English Bible

    You shall make two cherubim of hammered gold. You shall make them at the two ends of the mercy seat.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And thou shalt make two cherubim of gold; of beaten work shalt thou make them, at the two ends of the mercy-seat.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 25:18

    Thou shalt make two cherubims - What these were we cannot distinctly say. It is generally supposed that a cherub was a creature with four heads and one body: and the animals, of which these emblematical forms consisted, were the noblest of their kinds; the lion among the wild beasts, the bull among the tame ones, the eagle among the birds, and man at the head of all; so that they might be, says Dr. Priestley, the representatives of all nature. Concerning their forms and design there is much difference of opinion among divines. It is probable that the term often means a figure of any kind, such as was ordinarily sculptured on stone, engraved on metal, carved on wood, or embroidered on cloth. See on Exodus 35:8 (note). It may be only necessary to add, that cherub is the singular number; cherubim, not cherubims, the plural. See what has been said on this subject in the note on Genesis 3:24 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 25:18

    The cherubim of the mercy-seat were human figures, each having two wings. They must have been of small size, proportioned to the area of the mercy-seat. Comparing the different references to form in this place, in 2 Samuel 22:11 Psalm 18:10, in Ezekiel 1; 10 and in Revelation 4:1-11, it would appear that the name "cherub" was applied to various combinations of animal forms. Among the Egyptians, the Assyrians and the Greeks, as well as the Hebrews, the creatures by far most frequently introduced into these composite figures, were man, the ox, the lion, and the eagle, as being types of the most important and familiarly known classes of living material beings. Hence, the cherubim, described by Ezekiel, have been regarded as representing the whole creation engaged in the worship and service of God (compare Revelation 4:9-11; Revelation 5:13); and it would be in harmony with this view to suppose that the more strictly human shape of the cherubim of the mercy seat represented the highest form of created intelligence engaged in the devout contemplation of the divine law of love and justice. (Compare 1 Peter 1:12.) It is worthy of notice that the golden cherubim from between which Yahweh spoke Exodus 25:22 to His people bore witness, by their place on the mercy-seat, to His redeeming mercy; while the cherubim that took their stand at the gate of Eden, Genesis 3:24, to keep the way to the tree of life, witnessed to His condemnation of sin in man.

    Exodus 25:18

    Of beaten work - i. e. elaborately worked with the hammer.

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 25:18

    25:18 The cherubim (Cherubim is the plural of Cherub, not Cherubims) were fixed to the mercy - seat, and of a piece with it, and spread their wings over it. It is supposed these were designed to represent the holy angels, (who always attend the Shechinah, or divine majesty,) not by any effigies of an angel, but some emblem of the angelical nature, probably one or more of those four faces spoken of Eze 1:10. Whatever the faces were, they looked one towards another, and both downwards towards the ark, while their wings were stretched out so as to touch one another. It notes their attendance upon the Redeemer, their readiness to do his will, their presence in the assemblies of saints, Psa 68:17 1Cor 11:10, and their desire to look into the mysteries of the gospel, which they diligently contemplate, 1Pet 1:12. God is said to dwell or sit between the cherubim, on the mercy - seat, Psa 80:1, and from thence he here promiseth for the future to meet with Moses, and to commune with him. Thus he manifests himself, willing to keep up communion with us, by the mediation of Christ.