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Exodus 5:22

    Exodus 5:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Moses returned unto the LORD, and said, LORD, wherefore hast thou so evil entreated this people? why is it that thou hast sent me?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Moses returned to the LORD, and said, LORD, why have you so evil entreated this people? why is it that you have sent me?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Moses returned unto Jehovah, and said, Lord, wherefore hast thou dealt ill with this people? why is it that thou hast sent me?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Moses went back to the Lord and said, Lord, why have you done evil to this people? why have you sent me?

    Webster's Revision

    And Moses returned unto Jehovah, and said, Lord, wherefore hast thou dealt ill with this people? why is it that thou hast sent me?

    World English Bible

    Moses returned to Yahweh, and said, "Lord, why have you brought trouble on this people? Why is it that you have sent me?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Moses returned unto the LORD, and said, Lord, wherefore hast thou evil entreated this people? why is it that thou hast sent me?

    Definitions for Exodus 5:22

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 5:22

    And Moses returned unto the Lord - This may imply, either that there was a particular place into which Moses ordinarily went to commune with Jehovah; or it may mean that kind of turning of heart and affection to God, which every pious mind feels itself disposed to practice in any time or place. The old adage will apply here: "A praying heart never lacks a praying place." Lord, wherefore hast thou so evil entreated this people? - It is certain that in this address Moses uses great plainness of speech. Whether the offspring of a testy impatience and undue familiarity, or of strong faith which gave him more than ordinary access to the throne of his gracious Sovereign, it would be difficult to say. The latter appears to be the most probable, as we do not find, from the succeeding chapter, that God was displeased with his freedom; we may therefore suppose that it was kept within due bounds, and that the principles and motives were all pure and good. However, it should be noted, that such freedom of speech with the Most High should never be used but on very special occasions, and then only by his extraordinary messengers.