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Exodus 9:31

    Exodus 9:31 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the flax and the barley was smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the flax and the barley was smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was in bloom.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the flax and the barley were smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was in bloom.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the flax and the barley were damaged, for the barley was almost ready to be cut and the flax was in flower.

    Webster's Revision

    And the flax and the barley were smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was in bloom.

    World English Bible

    The flax and the barley were struck, for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was in bloom.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the flax and the barley were smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled.

    Definitions for Exodus 9:31

    Bolled - Blossomed; in the seed/pod.
    Ear - To work, till, or plough the ground.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 9:31

    The flax and the barley was smitten - The word פשתה pishtah, flax, Mr. Parkhurst thinks, is derived from the root פשט pashat, to strip, because the substance which we term flax is properly the bark or rind of the vegetable, pilled or stripped off the stalks. From time immemorial Egypt was celebrated for the production and manufacture of flax: hence the linen and fine linen of Egypt, so often spoken of in ancient authors.

    Barley - שערה seorah, from שער saar, to stand on end, to be rough, bristly, etc.; hence שער sear, the hair of the head, and שעיר sair, a he-goat, because of its shaggy hair; and hence also barley, because of the rough and prickly beard with which the ears are covered and defended.

    Dr. Pocock has observed that there is a double seed-time and harvest in Egypt: Rice, India wheat, and a grain called the corn of Damascus, and in Italian surgo rosso, are sown and reaped at a very different time from wheat, barley and flax. The first are sown in March, before the overflowing of the Nile, and reaped about October; whereas the wheat and barley are sown in November and December, as soon as the Nile is gone off, and are reaped before May.

    Pliny observes, Hist. Nat., lib. xviii., cap. 10, that in Egypt the barley is ready for reaping in six months after it is sown, and wheat in seven. In Aegypto Hordeum sexto a satu mense, Feumenta septimo metuntur.

    The flax was boiled - Meaning, I suppose, was grown up into a stalk: the original is גבעל gibol, podded or was in the pod.

    The word well expresses that globous pod on the top of the stalk of flax which succeeds the flower and contains the seed, very properly expressed by the Septuagint, το δε λινον σπερματιζον, but the flax was in seed or was seeding.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 9:31

    The flax was bolled - i. e. in blossom. This marks the time. In the north of Egypt the barley ripens and flax blossoms about the middle of February, or at the latest early in March, and both are gathered in before April, when the wheat harvest begins. The cultivation of flax must have been of great importance; linen was preferred to any material, and exclusively used by the priests. It is frequently mentioned on Egyptian monuments.