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Galatians 6:2

    Galatians 6:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Bear you one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Take on yourselves one another's troubles, and so keep the law of Christ.

    Webster's Revision

    Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.

    World English Bible

    Bear one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

    Clarke's Commentary on Galatians 6:2

    Bear ye one another's burdens - Have sympathy; feel for each other; and consider the case of a distressed brother as your own.

    And so fulfill the law of Christ - That law or commandment, Ye shall love one another; or that, Do unto all men as ye would they should do unto you. We should be as indulgent to the infirmities of others, as we can be consistently with truth and righteousness: our brother's infirmity may be his burden; and if we do not choose to help him to bear it, let us not reproach him because he is obliged to carry the load.

    Barnes' Notes on Galatians 6:2

    Bear ye one another's burdens - See the note at Romans 15:1. Bear with each other; help each other in the divine life. The sense is, that every man has special temptations and easily besetting sins, which constitute a heavy burden. We should aid each other in regard to these, and help one another to overcome them.

    And so fulfil the law of Christ - The special law of Christ, requiring us to love one another; see the note at John 13:34. This was the distinguishing law of the Redeemer; and they could in no way better fulfil it than by aiding each other in the divine life. The law of Christ would not allow us to reproach the offender, or to taunt him, or to rejoice in his fall. We should help him to take up his load of infirmities, and sustain him by our counsels, our exhortations, and our prayers. Christians, conscious of their infirmities, have a right to the sympathy and the prayers of their brethren. They should not be cast off to a cold and heartless world; a world rejoicing over their fall, and ready to brand them as hypocrites. They should be pressed to the warm bosom of brotherly kindness; and prayer should be made to ascend without ceasing around an erring and a fallen brother. Is this the case in regard to all who bear the Christian name?