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Genesis 10:26

    Genesis 10:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Joktan begat Almodad, and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jerah,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Joktan begat Almodad, and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jerah,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Joktan begat Almodad, and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jerah,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Joktan was the father of Almodad and Sheleph and Hazarmaveth and Jerah

    Webster's Revision

    And Joktan begat Almodad, and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jerah,

    World English Bible

    Joktan became the father of Almodad, Sheleph, Hazarmaveth, Jerah,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Joktan begat Almodad, and Sheleph, and Hazarmaveth, and Jerah;

    Definitions for Genesis 10:26

    Begat - To bear; to bring forth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 10:26

    Joktan - He had thirteen sons who had their dwelling from Mesha unto Sephar, a mount of the east, which places Calmet supposes to be mount Masius, on the west in Mesopotamia, and the mountains of the Saphirs on the east in Armenia, or of the Tapyrs farther on in Media. In confirmation that all men have been derived from one family, let it be observed that there are many customs and usages, both sacred and civil, which have prevailed in all parts of the world; and that these could owe their origin to nothing but a general institution, which could never have existed, had not mankind been originally of the same blood, and instructed in the same common notions before they were dispersed. Among these usages may be reckoned,

    1. The numbering by tens.

    2. Their computing time by a cycle of seven days.

    3. Their setting apart the seventh day for religious purposes.

    4. Their use of sacrifices, propitiatory and eucharistical.

    5. The consecration of temples and altars.

    6. The institution of sanctuaries or places of refuge, and their privileges.

    7. Their giving a tenth part of the produce of their fields, etc., for the use of the altar.

    8. The custom of worshipping the Deity bare-footed.

    9. Abstinence of the men from all sensual gratifications previously to their offering sacrifice.

    10. The order of priesthood and its support.

    11. The notion of legal pollutions, defilements, etc.

    12. The universal tradition of a general deluge.

    13. The universal opinion that the rainbow was a Divine sign, or portent, etc., etc.


    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 10:26

    The thirteen tribes of the Joctanites or primitive Arabs are enumerated here in Genesis 10:26-29.

    (58) Almodad is usually referred to Yemen. The first syllable may be the Arabic article. Mudad is the name of one celebrated in Arab story as the stepfather of Ishmael and chief of the Jurhum tribe of Joctanites. The Ἀλλουμαιῶται Alloumaiōtai of Ptolemy belonged to the interior of Arabia Felix.

    (59) Sheleph is traced in the Σαλαπηνοὶ Salapeenoi of Ptolemy (vi. 7), belonging to the interior.

    (60) Hazarmaveth gives name to a district on the Indian Ocean, abounding in spices, now called Hadramaut. This tribe is the Chatramitae of Greek writers.

    (61) Jerah occupied a district where are the coast and mountain of the moon, near Hadramaut.

    (62) Hadoram is preserved in the tribe called Ἀδραμῖται Adamitai Atramitae, placed by Pliny (vi. 28) between the Homerites and the Sachalites on the south coast of Arabia.

    (63) Uzal perhaps gave the ancient name of Azal to Sana, the capital of Yemen, a place still celebrated for the manufacture of beautiful stuffs.

    (64) Diclah settled possibly in the palm-bearing region of the Minaei in Hejaz.

    (65) Obal is otherwise unknown.

    (66) Abimael is equally obscure. Bochart supposes there is a trace of the name in Μάλι Mali, a place in Arabia Aromatifera.

    (67) Sheba is the progenitor of the Sabaei in Arabia Felix, celebrated for spices, gold, and precious stones, and noted for the prosperity arising from traffic in these commodities. A queen of Sheba visited Solomon. The dominant family among the Sabaeans was that of Himjar, from whom the Himjarites (Homeritae) of a later period descended.

    (68) Ophir gave name to a country celebrated for gold, precious stones, and almug wood, which seems to have lain on the south side of Arabia, where these products may be found. What kind of tree the almug is has not been clearly ascertained. Some suppose it to be the sandal wood which grows in Persia and India; others, a species of pine. If this wood was not native, it may have been imported from more distant countries to Ophir, which was evidently a great emporium. Others, however, have supposed Ophir to be in India, or Eastern Africa. The chief argument for a more distant locality arises from the supposed three years' voyage to it from Ezion-geber, and the products obtained in the country so reached. But the three years' voyage 1 Kings 10:22; 2 Chronicles 9:21 seems to be in reality to Tarshish, a very different region.

    (69) Havilah here is the founder of a Joctanite tribe of Arabs, and therefore his territory must be sought somewhere in the extensive country which was occupied by these wandering tribes. A trace of the name is probably preserved in Khawlan, a district lying in the northwest of Yemen, between Sana and Mecca, though the tribe may have originally settled or extended further north.

    (70) Jobab has been compared with the Ἰωβαρῖται Iōbaritai of Ptolemy (vi. 7). Bochart finds the name in the Arabic: yobab, a desert.

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