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Genesis 12:13

    Genesis 12:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister: that it may be well with me for thy sake; and my soul shall live because of thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Say, I pray you, you are my sister: that it may be well with me for your sake; and my soul shall live because of you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister; that it may be well with me for thy sake, and that my soul may live because of thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Say, then, that you are my sister, and so it will be well with me because of you, and my life will be kept safe on your account.

    Webster's Revision

    Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister; that it may be well with me for thy sake, and that my soul may live because of thee.

    World English Bible

    Please say that you are my sister, that it may be well with me for your sake, and that my soul may live because of you."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister: that it may be well with me for thy sake, and that my soul may live because of thee.

    Definitions for Genesis 12:13

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 12:13

    Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister - Abram did not wish his wife to tell a falsehood, but he wished her to suppress a part of the truth. From Genesis 20:12, it is evident she was his step-sister, i.e., his sister by his father, but by a different mother. Some suppose Sarai was the daughter of Haran, and consequently the grand-daughter of Terah: this opinion seems to be founded on Genesis 11:29, where Iscah is thought to be the same with Sarai, but the supposition has not a sufficiency of probability to support it.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 12:13

    12:13 Say thou art my sister - The grace Abram was most eminent for was faith, and yet he thus fell through unbelief and distrust of the divine Providence, even after God had appeared to him twice. Alas, What will become of the willows, when the cedars are thus shaken