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Genesis 12:17

    Genesis 12:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the LORD plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai Abram's wife.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the LORD plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai Abram's wife.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Jehovah plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai, Abram's wife.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Lord sent great troubles on Pharaoh's house because of Sarai, Abram's wife.

    Webster's Revision

    And Jehovah plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai, Abram's wife.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai, Abram's wife.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the LORD plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues because of Sarai Abram's wife.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 12:17

    The Lord plagued Pharaoh - What these plagues were we know not. In the parallel case, Genesis 20:18, all the females in the family of Abimelech, who had taken Sarah in nearly the same way, were made barren; possibly this might have been the case here; yet much more seems to be signified by the expression great plagues. Whatever these plagues were, it is evident they were understood by Pharaoh as proofs of the disapprobation of God; and, consequently, even at this time in Egypt there was some knowledge of the primitive and true religion.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 12:17

    The Lord, who had chosen him, unworthy though he was, yet not more unworthy than others, to be the agent of His gracious purpose, now interposes to effect his deliverance. "And the Lord plagued Pharaoh." The mode of the divine interference is suited to have the desired effect on the parties concerned. As Pharaoh is punished, we conclude he was guilty in the eye of heaven in this matter. He committed a breach of hospitality by invading the private abode of the stranger. He further infringed the law of equity between man and man in the most tender point, by abstracting, if not with violence, at least with a show of arbitrary power which could not be resisted, a female, whether sister or wife, from the home of her natural guardian without the consent of either. A deed of ruthless self-will, also, is often rendered more heinous by a blamable inattention to the character or position of him who is wronged. So it was with Pharaoh. Abram was a man of blameless life and inoffensive manners. He was, moreover, the chosen and special servant of the Most High God. Pharaoh, however, does not condescend to inquire who the stranger is whom he is about to wrong; and is thus unwittingly involved in an aggravated crime. But the hand of the Almighty brings even tyrants to their senses. "And his house." The princes of Pharaoh were accomplices in his crime Genesis 12:15, and his domestics were concurring with him in carrying it into effect. But even apart from any positive consent or connivance in a particular act, men, otherwise culpable, are brought into trouble in this world by the faults of those with whom they are associated. "On account of Sarai." Pharoah was made aware of the cause of the plagues or strokes with which he was now visited.