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Genesis 21:25

    Genesis 21:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of a well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of a well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of the well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But Abraham made a protest to Abimelech because of a water-hole which Abimelech's servants had taken by force.

    Webster's Revision

    And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of the well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    World English Bible

    Abraham complained to Abimelech because of a water well, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of the well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 21:25

    Abraham reproved Abimelech - Wells were of great consequence in those hot countries, and especially where the flocks were numerous, because the water was scarce, and digging to find it was accompanied with much expense of time and labor.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 21:25

    Abraham takes occasion to remonstrate with Abimelek about a well which his people had seized. Wells were extremely valuable in Palestine, on account of the long absence of rain between the latter or vernal rain ending in March, and the early or autumnal rain beginning in November. The digging of a well was therefore a matter of the greatest moment, and often gave a certain title to the adjacent fields. Hence, the many disputes about wells, as the neighboring Emirs or chieftains were jealous of rights so acquired, and often sought to enter by the strong hand on the labors of patient industry. Hence, Abraham lays more stress on a public attestation that he has dug, and is therefore the owner of this well, than on all the rest of the treaty. Seven is the number of sanctity, and therefore of obligation. This number is accordingly figured in some part of the form of confederation; in the present case, in the seven ewe-lambs which Abraham tenders, and Abimelek, in token of consent, accepts at his hand. The name of the well is remarkable as an instance of the various meanings attached to nearly the same sound. Even in Hebrew it means the well of seven, or the well of the oath, as the roots of seven, and of the verb meaning to swear, have the same radical letters. Bir es-Seba means "the well of seven or of the lion."