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Genesis 25:19

    Genesis 25:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son: Abraham begat Isaac:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son: Abraham begat Isaac:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son. Abraham begat Isaac.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now these are the generations of Abraham's son Isaac:

    Webster's Revision

    And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son. Abraham begat Isaac.

    World English Bible

    This is the history of the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son. Abraham became the father of Isaac.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son: Abraham begat Isaac:

    Definitions for Genesis 25:19

    Begat - To bear; to bring forth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 25:19

    These are the generations of Isaac - This is the history of Isaac and his family. Here the sixth section of the law begins, called תולדת יעחק toledoth yitschak; as the fifth, called חיי שרה chaiye Sarah, which begins with Genesis 23, ends at the preceding verse.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 25:19

    - LIII. Birth of Esau and Jacob

    20. פדן padān, Paddan, "plowed field;" related: "cut, plow."

    25. עשׂי ‛êśâv, 'Esaw, "hairy, or made."

    26. יעקב ya‛ăqôb, Ja'aqob, "he shall take the heel."

    27. תם tām, "perfect, peaceful, plain." The epithet refers to disposition, and contrasts the comparatively civilized character of Jacob with the rude temper of Esau.

    30. אדים 'ědôm, Edom, "red."

    The ninth document here begins with the usual phrase, and continues to the end of the thirty-fifth chapter. It contains the history of the second of the three patriarchs, or rather, indeed, as the opening phrase intimates, of the generations of Isaac; that is, of his son Jacob. Isaac himself makes little figure in the sacred history. Born when his mother was ninety, and his father a hundred years of age, he is of a sedate, contemplative, and yielding disposition. Consenting to be laid on the altar as a sacrifice to God, he had the stamp of submission early and deeply impressed on his soul. His life corresponds with these antecedents. Hence, in the spiritual aspect of his character he was the man of patience, of acquiescence, of susceptibility, of obedience. His qualities were those of the son, as Abraham's were those of the father. He carried out, but did not initiate; he followed, but did not lead; he continued, but did not commence. Accordingly, the docile and patient side of the saintly character is now to be presented to our view.

    Genesis 25:19-26

    The birth of Esau and Jacob. "The son of forty years." Hence, we learn that Isaac was married the third year after his mother's death, when Abraham was in his hundred and fortieth year. "Bethuel the Aramaean." As Bethuel was a descendant of Arpakshad, not of Aram, he is here designated, not by his descent, but by his adopted country Aram. By descent he was a Kasdi or Kaldee. Sarah was barren for at least thirty years; Rebekah for nineteen years. This drew forth the prayer of Isaac in regard to his wife. The heir of promise was to be a child of prayer, and accordingly when the prayer ascended the fruit of the womb was given. Rebekah had unwonted sensations connected with her pregnancy. She said to herself, "If it be so," if I have conceived seed, "why am I thus," why this strange struggle within me? In the artlessness of her faith she goes to the Lord for an explanation. We are not informed in what way she consulted God, or how he replied. The expression, "she went to inquire of the Lord," implies that there was some place of worship and communion with God by prayer. We are not to suppose that she went to Abraham, or any other prophet, if such were then at hand, when we have no intimation of this in the text. Her communication with the Lord seems to have been direct. This passage conveys to us the intimation that there was now a fixed mode and perhaps place of inquiring at the Lord. The Lord answers the mother of the promised seed. Two children are in her womb, the parents of two nations, differing in their dispositions and destinies. The one is to be stronger than the other. The order of nature is to be reversed in them; for the older will serve the younger. Their struggles in the womb are a prelude to their future history.