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Genesis 27:4

    Genesis 27:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And make me savoury meat, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat; that my soul may bless thee before I die.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And make me savoury meat, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat; that my soul may bless you before I die.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And make me savory food, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat. That my soul may bless thee before I die.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And make me food, good to the taste, such as is pleasing to me, and put it before me, so that I may have a meal and give you my blessing before death comes to me.

    Webster's Revision

    And make me savory food, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat. That my soul may bless thee before I die.

    World English Bible

    Make me savory food, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat, and that my soul may bless you before I die."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and make me savoury meat, such as I love, and bring it to me, that I may eat; that my soul may bless thee before I die.

    Definitions for Genesis 27:4

    Meat - Food.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 27:4

    Savory meat - מטעמים matammim, from טעם taam, to taste or relish; how dressed we know not, but its name declares its nature.

    That I may eat - The blessing which Isaac was to confer on his son was a species of Divine right, and must be communicated with appropriate ceremonies. As eating and drinking were used among the Asiatics on almost all religious occasions, and especially in making and confirming covenants, it is reasonable to suppose that something of this kind was essentially necessary on this occasion, and that Isaac could not convey the right till he had eaten of the meat provided for the purpose by him who was to receive the blessing. As Isaac was now old, and in a feeble and languishing condition, it was necessary that the flesh used on this occasion should be prepared so as to invite the appetite, that a sufficiency of it might be taken to revive and recruit his drooping strength, that he might be the better able to go through the whole of this ceremony.

    This seems to be the sole reason why savory meat is so particularly mentioned in the text. When we consider, 1. That no covenant was deemed binding unless the parties had eaten together; 2. That to convey this blessing some rite of this kind was necessary; and, 3. That Isaac's strength was now greatly exhausted, insomuch that he supposed himself to be dying; we shall at once see why meat was required on this occasion, and why that meat was to be prepared so as to deserve the epithet of savory.

    As I believe this to be the true sense of the place, I do not trouble my readers with interpretations which I suppose to be either exceptionable or false.