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Genesis 32:14

    Genesis 32:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Two hundred she goats, and twenty he goats, two hundred ewes, and twenty rams,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Two hundred she goats, and twenty he goats, two hundred ewes, and twenty rams,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    two hundred she-goats and twenty he-goats, two hundred ewes and twenty rams,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Two hundred she-goats and twenty he-goats, two hundred females and twenty males from the sheep,

    Webster's Revision

    two hundred she-goats and twenty he-goats, two hundred ewes and twenty rams,

    World English Bible

    two hundred female goats and twenty male goats, two hundred ewes and twenty rams,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    two hundred she-goats and twenty he-goats, two hundred ewes and twenty rams,

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 32:14

    Two hundred she-goats, etc. - This was a princely present, and such as was sufficient to have compensated Esau for any kind of temporal loss he might have sustained in being deprived of his birthright and blessing. The thirty milch camels were particularly valuable, for milch camels among the Arabs constitute a principal part of their riches, the creature being every way so serviceable that the providence of God appears peculiarly kind and wise in providing such a beast for those countries where no other animal could be of equal service. "The she-camel gives milk continually, not ceasing till great with young; the milk of which," as Pliny has remarked, "when mixed with three parts of water, affords the most pleasant and wholesome beverage." Cameli lac habent, donec iterum gravescant, suavissimumque hoc existimatur, ad unam mensuram tribus aquae additis - Hist. Nat., lib. 11., chap. 41.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 32:14

    Jacob sends forward a present to Esau. "He lodged there that night." Mahanaim may have been about twenty-five miles from the Jabbok. At some point in the interval he awaited the return of his messengers. Abiding during the night in the camp, not far from the ford of the Jabbok, he selects and sends forward to Esau his valuable present of five hundred and fifty head of cattle. "That which was come into his hand," into his possession. The cattle are selected according to the proportions of male and female which were adopted from experience among the ancients (Varro, de re rust. II. 3). "Every drove by itself," with a space between, that Esau might have time to estimate the great value of the gift. The repetition of the announcement of the gift, and of Jacob himself being at hand, was calculated to appease Esau, and persuade him that Jacob was approaching him in all brotherly confidence and affection. "Appease him." Jacob designs this gift to be the means of propitiating his brother before he appears in his presence. "Lift up my face," accept me. "Lodged that night in the camp;" after sending this present over the Jabbok. This seems the same night referred to in Genesis 32:14.