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Genesis 34:6

    Genesis 34:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Hamor the father of Shechem went out unto Jacob to commune with him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Hamor the father of Shechem went out to Jacob to commune with him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Hamor the father of Shechem went out unto Jacob to commune with him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Hamor, the father of Shechem, came out to have a talk with Jacob.

    Webster's Revision

    And Hamor the father of Shechem went out unto Jacob to commune with him.

    World English Bible

    Hamor the father of Shechem went out to Jacob to talk with him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Hamor the father of Shechem went out unto Jacob to commune with him.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 34:6

    A conference takes place between the parties. Hamer and Jacob, the parents on both sides, are the principals in the negotiation. The sons of Jacob, being brothers of the injured damsel, are present, according to custom. "Wrought fully in Israel;" a standing phrase from this time forward for any deed that was contrary to the sanctity which ought to characterize God's holy people. Israel is used here to designate the descendants of Israel, the special people. Hamer makes his proposal. "Shekem, my son." These words are a nominative pendent, for which "his soul" is substituted. He proposes a political alliance or amalgamation of the two tribes, to be sealed and actually effected by intermarriage. He offers to make them joint-possessors of the soil, and of the rights of dwelling, trading, and acquiring property. Shekem now speaks with becoming deference and earnestness.

    He offers any amount of dowry, or bridal presents, and of gift to the mother and brothers of the bride. It must be acknowledged that the father and the son were disposed to make whatever amends they could for the grievous offence that had been committed. The sons of Jacob answer with deceit. They are burning with resentment of the wrong that "ought not to have been done," and that cannot now be fully repaired. Yet they are in presence of a superior force, and therefore, resort to deceit. "And spake." This goes along with the previous verb "answered," and is meant to have the same qualification "with deceit." The last clause of the verse then assigns the cause of this deceitful dealing. Their speech, for the matter of it, is reasonable. They cannot intermarry with the uncircumcised. Only on condition that every male be circumcised will they consent. On these terms they promise to "become one people" with them. Otherwise they take their daughter, and depart. Our daughter. They here speak as a family or race, and therefore, call Dinah their daughter, though her brothers are the speakers.