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Genesis 37:5

    Genesis 37:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it his brethren: and they hated him yet the more.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it his brothers: and they hated him yet the more.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it to his brethren: and they hated him yet the more.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now Joseph had a dream, and he gave his brothers an account of it, which made their hate greater than ever.

    Webster's Revision

    And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it to his brethren: and they hated him yet the more.

    World English Bible

    Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it to his brothers, and they hated him all the more.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it to his brethren: and they hated him yet the more.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 37:5

    Joseph's dreams excite the jealousy of his brothers. His frankness in reciting his dream to his brothers marks a spirit devoid of guile, and only dimly conscious of the import of his nightly visions. The first dream represents by a figure the humble submission of all his brothers to him, as they rightly interpret it. "For his dreams and for his words." The meaning of this dream was offensive enough, and his telling of it rendered it even more disagreeable. A second dream is given to express the certainty of the event Genesis 41:32. The former serves to interpret the latter. There the sheaves are connected with the brothers who bound them, and thereby indicate the parties. The eleven stars are not so connected with them. But here Joseph is introduced directly without a figure, and the number eleven, taken along with the eleven sheaves of the former dream, makes the application to the brothers plain. The sun and moon clearly point out the father and mother. The mother is to be taken, we conceive, in the abstract, without nicely inquiring whether it means the departed Rachel, or the probably still living Leah. Not even the latter seems to have lived to see the fulfillment of this prophetic dream Genesis 49:31. The second dream only aggravated the hatred of his brothers; but his father, while rebuking him for his speeches, yet marked the saying. The rebuke seems to imply that the dream, or the telling of it, appears to his father to indicate the lurking of a self-sufficient or ambitious spirit within the breast of the youthful Joseph. The twofold intimation, however, came from a higher source.