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Genesis 4:9

    Genesis 4:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the LORD said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: Am I my brother's keeper?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the LORD said to Cain, Where is Abel your brother? And he said, I know not: Am I my brother's keeper?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Jehovah said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: am I my brother's keeper?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Lord said to Cain, Where is your brother Abel? And he said, I have no idea: am I my brother's keeper?

    Webster's Revision

    And Jehovah said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: am I my brother's keeper?

    World English Bible

    Yahweh said to Cain, "Where is Abel, your brother?" He said, "I don't know. Am I my brother's keeper?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the LORD said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: am I my brother's keeper?

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 4:9

    Where is Habel thy brother? - The interrogatory here reminds us of the question put to the hiding Adam, "Where art thou?" It is calculated to strike the conscience. The reply is different from that of Adam. The sin has now advanced from hasty, incautious yielding to the tempter, to reiterated and deliberate disobedience. Such a sinner must take different ground. Cain, therefore, attempts to parry the question, apparently on the vain supposition that no eye, not even that of the All-seeing, was present to witness the deed. "I know not." In the madness of his confusion he goes further. He disputes the right of the Almighty to make the demand. "Am I my brother's keeper?" There is, as usual, an atom of truth mingled with the amazing falsehood of this surly response. No man is the absolute keeper of his brother, so as to be responsible for his safety when he is not present. This is what Cain means to insinuate. But every man is his brother's keeper so far that he is not himself to lay the hand of violence on him, nor suffer another to do so if he can hinder it. This sort of keeping the Almighty has a right to demand of every one - the first part of it on the ground of mere justice, the second on that of love. But Cain's reply betrays a desperate resort to falsehood, a total estrangement of feeling, a quenching of brotherly love, a predominence of that selfishness which freezes affection and kindles hatred. This is the way of Cain Jde 1:11.