Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Genesis 40:1

    Genesis 40:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker had offended their lord the king of Egypt.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker had offended their lord the king of Egypt.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker offended their lord the king of Egypt.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now after these things the chief servant who had the care of the wine, and the chief bread-maker in Pharaoh's house, did something against Pharaoh's orders;

    Webster's Revision

    And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker offended their lord the king of Egypt.

    World English Bible

    It happened after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker offended their lord, the king of Egypt.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker offended their lord the king of Egypt.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 40:1

    The butler - משקה mashkeh, the same as saky among the Arabians and Persians, and signifying a cup-bearer.

    Baker - אפה opheh; rather cook, confectioner, or the like.

    Had offended - They had probably been accused of attempting to take away the king's life, one by poisoning his drink, the other by poisoning his bread or confectionaries.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 40:1

    The chief butler and chief baker, high officials in Pharaoh's court, come under the displeasure of their sovereign. "In the house of the captain of the guards." It appears that this officer's establishment contained the keep in which Joseph and these criminals were confined. "Charged Joseph with them." As Joseph was his slave, and these were state prisoners, he appointed him to wait upon them. It is probable that Joseph's character had been somewhat re-established with him during his residence in the prison.