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Genesis 40:23

    Genesis 40:23 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgot him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But the wine-servant did not keep Joseph in mind or give a thought to him.

    Webster's Revision

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.

    World English Bible

    Yet the chief cupbearer didn't remember Joseph, but forgot him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 40:23

    Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph - Had he mentioned the circumstance to Pharaoh, there is no doubt that Joseph's case would have been examined into, and he would in consequence have been restored to his liberty; but, owing to the ingratitude of the chief butler, he was left two years longer in prison.

    Many commentators have seen in every circumstance in the history of Joseph a parallel between him and our blessed Lord. So, "Joseph in prison represents Christ in the custody of the Jews; the chief butler and the chief baker represent the two thieves which were crucified with our Lord; and as one thief was pardoned, and the other left to perish, so the chief butler was restored to his office, and the chief baker hanged." I believe God never designed such parallels; and I am astonished to find comparatively grave and judicious men trifling in this way, and forcing the features of truth into the most distorted anamorphosis, so that even her friends blush to acknowledge her. This is not a light matter; we should beware how we attribute designs to God that he never had, and employ the Holy Spirit in forming trifling and unimportant similitudes. Of plain, direct truth we shall find as much in the sacred writings as we can receive and comprehend; let us not therefore hew out unto ourselves broken cisterns that can hold no water. Interpretations of this kind only tend to render the sacred writings uncertain; to expose to ridicule all the solemn types and figures which it really contains; and to furnish pretexts to infidels and irreligious people to scoff at all spirituality, and lead them to reject the word of God entirely, as incapable of being interpreted on any fixed or rational plan. The mischief done by this system is really incalculable. See the observations on Genesis 37 (note).