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Genesis 6:9

    Genesis 6:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    These are the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, and perfect in his generations: Noah walked with God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    These are the generations of Noah. Noah was an upright man and without sin in his generation: he went in the ways of God.

    Webster's Revision

    These are the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, and perfect in his generations: Noah walked with God.

    World English Bible

    This is the history of the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, blameless among the people of his time. Noah walked with God.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    These are the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, and perfect in his generations: Noah walked with God.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 6:9

    - Section VI - The Deluge

    - XXIII. The Ark

    9. דור dôr "age, time from birth to death," applied either to an individual or the whole contemporary race, running parallel with some leading individual. Hence, the "race" or "generation" living during that time.

    14. תבה tēbâh "chest, ark." It is used only of this vessel of Noah's construction, and of the little vessel in which Moses was put Exodus 2:3, Exodus 2:5. The root, according to Furst, means "to be hollow." אבה 'ēbeh a cognate word, signifies "a reed;" κιβωτός kibōtos Septuagint. גפר goper α. λ., perhaps "fir, cypress, resinous wood." קן qēn "nest, room; related: prepare, rear up."

    16. צהר tsohar "shining, light;" not the same as the חלון chalôn Genesis 8:6, or the aperture through which Noah let out the raven.

    18. ברית berı̂yt "covenant; related: cut, eat, choose, decide."

    The close of the preceding document introduces the opening topic of this one. The same rule applies to all that have gone before. The generations of the skies and the land Genesis 2:4 are introduced by the finishing of the skies and the land Genesis 2:1; the generations of man in the line of Sheth Genesis 5:1, by the birth of Sheth Genesis 4:25; and now the generations of Noah, by the notice that Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord. The narrative here also, as usual, reverts to a point of time before the stage of affairs described in the close of the preceding passage. Yet there is nothing here that seems to indicate a new author. The previous paragraph is historical, and closely connected with the end of the fourth chapter; and it suitably prepares for the proceedings of Noah, under the divine direction, on the eye of the deluge. We have now a recapitulation of the agent and the occasion, and then the divine commission and its execution.

    Genesis 6:9-12

    Here are the man and the occasion.

    Genesis 6:9-10

    The generations of Noah. - In the third document we had the generations of man; now we are limited to Noah, because he is himself at peace with God, and is now the head and representative of those who are in the same blessed relation. The narrative, therefore, for the first time, formally confines itself to the portion of the human family in communion with God, Noah is here characterized by two new and important epithets - "just" and "perfect." It is to be remembered that he had already found grace in the eyes of the Lord. Adam was created good; but by disobedience he became guilty, and all his race, Noah among the rest, became involved in that guilt. To be just is to be right in point of law, and thereby entitled to all the blessings of the acquitted and justified. When applied to the guilty, this epithet implies pardon of sin among other benefits of grace. It also presupposes that spiritual change by which the soul returns from estrangement to reconciliation with God. Hence, Noah is not only just, but perfect. This attribute of character imports not only the turning from darkness to light, from error to truth, from wrong to right, but the stability of moral determination which arises from the struggle, the trial, the victory of good over evil, therein involved. The just is the right in law; the perfect is the tested in holiness. "In his ages;" among the men of his age. This phrase indicates the contrast between Noah and the men of his day. It is probable, moreover, that he was of pure descent, and in that respect also distinguished from his contemporaries who were the offspring of promiscuous intermarriage between the godly and the ungodly. "Noah walked with God," like Henok. This is the native consequence of his victory over sin, and his acceptance with God. His sons are mentioned, as they are essentially connected with the following events.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 6:9

    6:9 Noah was a just man - Justified before God by faith in the promised seed; for he was an heir of the righteousness which is by faith, Heb 11:7. He was sanctified, and had right principles and dispositions implanted in him: and he was righteous in his conversation, one that made conscience of rendering to all their due, to God his due, and to men theirs. And he walked with God as Enoch had done before him: in his generation, even in that corrupt degenerate age. It is easy to be religious when religion is in fashion; but it is an evidence of strong faith to swim against the stream, and to appear for God, when no one else appears for him: so Noah did, and it is upon record to his immortal honour.