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Habakkuk 2:12

    Habakkuk 2:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and stablisheth a city by iniquity!

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Woe to him that builds a town with blood, and establishes a city by iniquity!

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and establisheth a city by iniquity!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A curse on him who is building a place with blood, and basing a town on evil-doing!

    Webster's Revision

    Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and establisheth a city by iniquity!

    World English Bible

    Woe to him who builds a town with blood, and establishes a city by iniquity!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and stablisheth a city by iniquity!

    Definitions for Habakkuk 2:12

    Iniquity - Sin; wickedness; evil.
    Stablisheth - Establishes; makes steadfast.
    Woe - An expression of grief or indignation.

    Clarke's Commentary on Habakkuk 2:12

    Wo to him that buildeth a town with blood - At the expense of much slaughter. This is the answer of the beam to the stone. And these things will refer to the vast fortunes gained, and the buildings erected, by means of the slave-trade; where, to a considerate and humane mind, the walls appear as if composed of the bones of negroes, and cemented by their blood! But the towns or houses established by this iniquity soon come to ruin; and the fortunes made have, in most cases, become as chaff and dust before the whirlwind of God's indignation. But where are the dealers in the souls and bodies of men? Ask him who has them in his keeping. He can tell.

    Barnes' Notes on Habakkuk 2:12

    Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and establisheth a city by iniquity! - Nebuchadnezzar "encircled the inner city with three walls and the outer city also with three, all of burnt brick. And having fortified the city with wondrous works, and adorned the gates like temples, he built another palace near the palace of his fathers, surpassing it in height and its great magnificence." He seemed to strengthen the city, and to establish it by outward defenses. But it was built through cruelty to conquered nations, and especially God's people, and by oppression, against His holy Will. So there was an inward rottenness and decay in what seemed strong and majestic, and which imposed on the outward eye; it would not stand, but fell. Babylon, which had stood since the flood, being enlarged contrary to the eternal laws of God, fell in the reign of his son. Such is all empire and greatness, raised on the neglect of God's laws, by unlawful conquests, and by the toil and sweat and hard service of the poor. Its aggrandizement and seeming strength is its fall. Daniel's exhortation to Nebuchadnezzar Daniel 4:27, "Redeem thy sins by righteousness, and thine iniquities by showing mercy on the poor," implies that oppressiveness had been one of his chief sins.