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Hebrews 5:11

    Hebrews 5:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Of whom we have many things to say, and hard to be uttered, seeing ye are dull of hearing.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Of whom we have many things to say, and hard to be uttered, seeing you are dull of hearing.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Of whom we have many things to say, and hard of interpretation, seeing ye are become dull of hearing.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Of whom we have much to say which it is hard to make clear, because you are slow of hearing.

    Webster's Revision

    Of whom we have many things to say, and hard of interpretation, seeing ye are become dull of hearing.

    World English Bible

    About him we have many words to say, and hard to interpret, seeing you have become dull of hearing.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Of whom we have many things to say, and hard of interpretation, seeing ye are become dull of hearing.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 5:11

    Of whom we have many things to say - The words περι οὑ, which we translate of whom, are variously applied:

    1. To Melchisedec;

    2. To Christ;

    3. To the endless priesthood.

    Those who understand the place of Melchisedec, suppose that it is in reference to this that the apostle resumes the subject in the seventh chapter, where much more is said on this subject, though not very difficult of comprehension; and indeed it is not to be supposed that the Hebrews could be more capable of understanding the subject when the apostle wrote the seventh chapter than they were when, a few hours before, he had written the fifth. It is more likely, therefore, that the words are to be understood as meaning Jesus, or that endless priesthood, of which he was a little before speaking, and which is a subject that carnal Christians cannot easily comprehend.

    Hard to be uttered - Δυσερμηνευτος· Difficult to be interpreted, because Melchisedec was a typical person. Or if it refer to the priesthood of Christ, that is still more difficult to be explained, as it implies, not only his being constituted a priest after this typical order, but his paying down the ransom for the sins of the whole world; and his satisfying the Divine justice by this sacrifice, but also thereby opening the kingdom of heaven to all believers, and giving the whole world an entrance to the holy of holies by his blood.

    Dull of hearing - Νωθροι ταις ακοαις· Your souls do not keep pace with the doctrines and exhortations delivered to you. As νωθρος signifies a person who walks heavily and makes little speed, it is here elegantly applied to those who are called to the Christian race, have the road laid down plain before them, how to proceed specified, and the blessings to be obtained enumerated, and yet make no exertions to get on, but are always learning, and never able to come to the full knowledge of the truth.

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 5:11

    Of whom we have many things to say - There are many things which seem strange in regard to him; many things which are hard to be understood. Paul knew that what be had to say of this man as a type of the Redeemer would excite wonder, and that many might be disposed to call it in question. He knew that in order to be understood, what he was about to say required a familiar acquaintance with the Scriptures, and a strong and elevated faith. A young convert; one who had just commenced the Christian life, could hardly expect to be able to understand it. The same thing is true now. One of the first questions which a young convert often asks, is, Who was Melchizedek? And one of the things which most uniformly perplex those who begin to study the Bible, is, the statement which is made about this remarkable man.

    Hard to be uttered - Rather, hard to be "interpreted," or "explained." So the Greek word means.

    Seeing ye are dull of hearing - That is, when they ought to have been acquainted with the higher truths of religion, they had shown that they received them slowly, and were dull of apprehension. On what particular "fact" Paul grounded this charge respecting them is unknown; nor could we know, unless we were better acquainted with the persons to whom he wrote, and their circumstances, than we now are. But he had doubtless in his eye some fact which showed that they were slow to understand the great principles of the gospel.

    Wesley's Notes on Hebrews 5:11

    5:11 Concerning whom - The apostle here begins an important digression, wherein he reproves, admonishes, and exhorts the Hebrews. We - Preachers of the gospel. Have many things to say, and hard to be explained - Though not so much from the subject - matter, as from your slothfulness in considering, and dulness in apprehending, the things of God.