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Isaiah 3:2

    Isaiah 3:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The mighty man, and the man of war, the judge, and the prophet, and the prudent, and the ancient,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The mighty man, and the man of war, the judge, and the prophet, and the prudent, and the ancient,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    the mighty man, and the man of war; the judge, and the prophet, and the diviner, and the elder;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The strong man and the man of war; the judge and the prophet; the man who has knowledge of secret arts, and the man who is wise because of his years;

    Webster's Revision

    the mighty man, and the man of war; the judge, and the prophet, and the diviner, and the elder;

    World English Bible

    the mighty man, the man of war, the judge, the prophet, the diviner, the elder,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    the mighty man, and the man of war; the judge, and the prophet, and the diviner, and the ancient;

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 3:2

    The mighty man - The hero, The idea expressed is not simply that of personal strength and prowess, but the higher one of military eminence or heroism. "Prof. Alexander." This was fully accomplished in the time of Nebuchadnezzar; 2 Kings 24:14.

    And the prudent - This word in the original - קסם qosēm - means properly "a diviner," or a "soothsayer." But it is sometimes used in a good sense; see Proverbs 16:10, "margin." The Chaldee understands it of a man "who is consulted," or whose opinion is asked, in times of perplexity or danger. The word was originally applied to false prophets, diviners, and soothsayers, who claimed the power of looking into futurity. It came, however, to denote also the man of sagacity, the statesman, the experienced counselor, who from the records of the past could judge of the future, and to whom, therefore, the nation could look in times of perplexity and danger. Vitringa supposes that it may refer here to the false prophets on whose advice the nation might be relying.

    The ancient - The old man. Such men, especially among the Hebrews, were deemed particularly qualified to give advice. They had experience; they kept the traditions of their fathers; they had conversed with the wise of the preceding generation; and in a land where there were few books, and knowledge was to be gained mainly by conversation and experience, great respect was shown them; see Leviticus 19:32; 2 Chronicles 31:17; 1 Kings 12:6, 1 Kings 12:8.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 3:2

    3:2 The judge - The civil magistrates. The ancient - Whose wisdom was increased by long experience.