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Isaiah 3:22

    Isaiah 3:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The changeable suits of apparel, and the mantles, and the wimples, and the crisping pins,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The changeable suits of apparel, and the mantles, and the wimples, and the crisping pins,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    the festival robes, and the mantles, and the shawls, and the satchels;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The feast-day dresses, and the robes, and the wide skirts, and the handbags,

    Webster's Revision

    the festival robes, and the mantles, and the shawls, and the satchels;

    World English Bible

    the fine robes, the capes, the cloaks, the purses,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    the festival robes, and the mantles, and the shawls, and the satchels;

    Definitions for Isaiah 3:22

    Crisping pins - Money bags or purses, highly ornamented.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 3:22

    The articles which are mentioned in the remaining part of this description, are entire articles of apparel; those which had preceded were chiefly single ornaments.

    The changeable suits of apparel - The word which is used here in the original comes from a verb signifying "to pull of" as a shoe; to unclothe one's-self; and it here denotes the more "costly" or "valuable" garments, which are not worn on common occasions, and which are "laid aside" in ordinary employments. This does not refer to any "particular" article of dress, but to splendid and costly articles in general. 'The Eastern ladies take great pride in having many changes of apparel, because their fashions never alter. Thus the net brocades worn by their grandmothers are equally fashionable for themselves.' - "Roberts."

    And the mantles - From the verb "to cover," or "to clothe." The word "mantle" does not quite express the force of the original. It means the fuller "tunic" which was worn over the common one, with sleeves, and which reached down to the feet. 'A loose robe,' says Roberts, 'which is gracefully crossed on the bosom.'

    And the wimples - Our word "wimple" means a "hood," or "veil," but this is not the meaning of the Hebrew word in this place. It means a wide, broad garment, which could be thrown over the whole, and in which the individual usually slept. 'Probably the fine muslin which is sometimes thrown over the head and body.' - "Roberts."

    And the crisping-pins - This phrase with us would denote "curling-irons." But the Hebrew here denotes a very different article. It means "money-bags," or "purses." These were often made very large, and were highly ornamented; compare 2 Kings 5:23. Frequently they were attached to the girdle.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 3:22

    3:22 Pins - Of silver or gold, either used to curl the hair, or fastened and worn in the hair.