(?):

Sign up

Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Isaiah 33:2

    Isaiah 33:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    O LORD, be gracious unto us; we have waited for thee: be thou their arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    O LORD, be gracious to us; we have waited for you: be you their arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    O Jehovah, be gracious unto us; we have waited for thee: be thou our arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    O Lord, have mercy on us; for we have been waiting for your help: be our strength every morning, our salvation in time of trouble.

    Webster's Revision

    O Jehovah, be gracious unto us; we have waited for thee: be thou our arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh, be gracious to us. We have waited for you. Be our strength every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    O LORD, be gracious unto us; we have waited for thee: be thou their arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 33:2

    Be thou their arm every morning "Be thou our strength every morning" - For זרעם zeroam, their arm, the Syriac, Chaldee, and Vulgate read זרענו zeroenu, our arm, in the first person of the pronoun, not the third: the edition of Felix Pratensis has זרעתינו zerootheynu in the margin.

    The prophet is here praying against the enemies of God's people; and yet this part of the prayer seems to be in their behalf: but from the above authorities it appears that Our arm is the true reading, though I do not find it confirmed by any of Kennicott's, De Rossi's, or my own MSS. My old MS. Bible has, - Be thou oure arm in erly.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 33:2

    O Lord - This is a solemn prayer to Yahweh, made by the Jews in the apprehension of the invasion of the Assyrian. It is not meant that this prayer was actually offered, but it is a prophetic representation indicating the alarm of the Jews at his approach, and their disposition to throw themselves upon the mercy of God.

    We have waited for thee - That is, we have looked for deliverance from this threatened invasion from thy hand (compare the note at Isaiah 26:8).

    Be thou their arm - The arm is a symbol of strengh. It is used in the Scriptures as emblematic of the divine protection, or of the interposition of God in time of calamity and dancer Exodus 15:16; Job 40:9; Psalm 44:3; Psalm 77:15; Psalm 89:21; Psalm 98:1. Lowth proposes to read 'our arm instead of 'their arm;' and the connection would seem to demand such a reading. The Vugate and the Chaldee read it in this manner, but there is no authority from manuscripts for a change in the text. The truth seems to be, that Isaiah, impelled by prophetic inspiration, here interposes his own feelings as a Jew, and offers his own prayer that God would be the strength of the nation. The form, however, is immediately changed, and he presents the prayer of the people.

    Every morning - Constantly; at all times.

    In the time of trouble - Referring particularly to the trouble consequent on the invasion of the Assyrians.

Join 4,000,000+ Christians on FB!

WANT CHRISTIAN VIDEOS IN YOUR INBOX? IT'S FREE!