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Isaiah 40:10

    Isaiah 40:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Behold, the Lord GOD will come with strong hand, and his arm shall rule for him: behold, his reward is with him, and his work before him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Behold, the Lord GOD will come with strong hand, and his arm shall rule for him: behold, his reward is with him, and his work before him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Behold, the Lord Jehovah will come as a mighty one, and his arm will rule for him: Behold, his reward is with him, and his recompense before him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    See, the Lord God will come as a strong one, ruling in power: see, those made free by him are with him, and those whom he has made safe go before him.

    Webster's Revision

    Behold, the Lord Jehovah will come as a mighty one, and his arm will rule for him: Behold, his reward is with him, and his recompense before him.

    World English Bible

    Behold, the Lord Yahweh will come as a mighty one, and his arm will rule for him. Behold, his reward is with him, and his recompense before him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Behold, the Lord GOD will come as a mighty one, and his arm shall rule for him: behold, his reward is with him, and his recompence before him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 40:10

    His reward is with him, and his work before him. "His reward is with him, and the recompense of his work before him" - That is, the reward and the recompense which he bestows, and which he will pay to his faithful servants; this he has ready at hand with him, and holds it out before him, to encourage those who trust in him and wait for him.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 40:10

    Behold, the Lord God will come - (See the note at Isaiah 40:3) Applied to the condition of the Jews in exile, this means that God would come to deliver them. Applied to the times of the Messiah, it means that God would manifest himself in a powerful manner as mighty to save.

    With strong hand - (בחזק bechâzâq). Margin, 'Against the strong.' So Vitringa and others understand it; and regard it as referring to the mighty enemies of the people of God, or, as Vitringa particularly supposes, to the great foe of God and his people - the prince of darkness - the devil. Lowth also translates it in this manner, 'Against the strong one.' The Septuagint renders it, Μετά ἰσχύος Meta ischuos - 'With strength.' This is the more probable meaning - that the Lord would come with the manifestation of strength and power, able to subdue and vanquish all the enemies of his people, and to effect their complete and final salvation.

    And his arm - The arm is a symbol of strength, because it is by that that we accomplish our purposes; by that a conqueror slays his enemies in battle, etc. Thus, 'Break thou the arm of the wicked;' that is, diminish or destroy his power Psalm 10:15. 'I have broken the arm of Pharaoh king of Egypt' (Ezekiel 30:21; compare Jeremiah 48:25). Thus it is said of God, 'Thou hast a mighty arm' Psalm 89:13, and, 'His holy arm hath gotten him the victory' (Psalm 98:1; compare Exodus 6:6). The metaphor is taken from the act of stretching out the arm to fight in battle, where the arm is the effective instrument in subduing an enemy.

    Shall rule for him - Lowth renders the phrase, לו lō, 'for him,' 'over him:' - 'And his arm shall prevail over him;' that is, over the strong and mighty foe. The Septuagint renders it, Μετά κυρίας Meta kurias - 'With dominion.' But the meaning seems to be, 'God is mighty by himself; his power resides in his own arm; he is not dependent on others; he will accomplish the deliverance in such a manner that it shall be seen that he did it alone; and he shall rule for himself, without any aid, and so that it shall be manifest that he is the sovereign.' In the deliverance of his people from their captivity, he so directed it, that it was manifest that he was their deliverer and sovereign; and in the redemption of man, the same thing is apparent, that the arm of God effects the deliverance, and that it is his own power that establishes the dominion.

    Behold, his reward is with him - He will be ready to confer the appropriate reward on his own people. The idea seems to be taken from the custom of a conqueror, who distributes rewards among his followers and soldiers after a signal victory. This was always done in ancient wars, apparently because it seemed to be an act of justice that those who had gained the victory should share also in the result, and this participation of the booty was a stimulus to future effort, as well as a compensation for their valor. The rewards distributed consisted generally of that which was taken from the conquered; gold, and silver, and raiment, as well as captives or slaves (see Genesis 49:7; Exodus 15:9; 1 Samuel 30:26; and particularly Judges 5:30):

    Have they not sped?

    Have they not divided the prey;

    To every man a damsel or two';

    To Sisera a prey of divers colors,

    A prey of divers colors of needle-work,

    Of divers colors of needle-work on both sides,

    Meet for the necks of them that take the spoil.

    The idea here is -

    1. That Yahweh would bestow appropriate rewards on his people.

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    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 40:10

    40:10 His arm - He shall need no succours, for his own power shall be sufficient to govern his people, and to destroy his adversaries. His reward - He comes furnished with recompences as well of blessings for his friends, as of vengeance for his enemies. His work - He carries on his work effectually: for that is said in scripture to be before a man which is in his power.