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Isaiah 57:2

    Isaiah 57:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He shall enter into peace: they shall rest in their beds, each one walking in his uprightness.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He shall enter into peace: they shall rest in their beds, each one walking in his uprightness.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He entereth into peace; they rest in their beds, each one that walketh in his uprightness.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    They are at rest in their last resting-places, every one going straight before him.

    Webster's Revision

    He entereth into peace; they rest in their beds, each one that walketh in his uprightness.

    World English Bible

    He enters into peace; they rest in their beds, each one who walks in his uprightness.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He entereth into peace; they rest in their beds, each one that walketh in his uprightness.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 57:2

    He shalt enter into peace "He shall go in peace" - יבוא שלום yabo shalom; the expression is elliptical, such as the prophet frequently uses. The same sense is expressed at large and in full terms, Genesis 15:15 : ואתה תבא אל אבותיך בשלום veattah libbo al abotheycha beshalom, "and thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace."

    They shall rest in their beds, each one walking in his uprightness "He shall rest in his bed; even the perfect man" - This obscure sentence is reduced to a perfectly good sense, and easy construction by an ingenious remark of Dr. Durell. He reads ינוח על משכבו תם yanuach al mishcabo tam, "the perfect man shall rest in his bed." Two MSS. (one of them ancient) have ינוח yanuach, singular; and so the Vulgate renders it, requiescat, "he shall rest." The verb was probably altered to make it plural, and so consistent with what follows after the mistake had been made in the following words, by uniting משכבו mishcabo and תם tam into one word. See Merrick's Annotations on the Psalms, Addenda; where the reader will find that J. S. Moerlius, by the same sort of correction, and by rescuing the adjective תם tam, which had been swallowed up in another word in the same manner, has restored to a clear sense a passage before absolutely unintelligible: -

    למו חרצבות אין כי lemo chartsubboth ein ki :אולם ובריא תם ulam ubari tham

    "For no distresses happen to them;

    Perfect and firm is their strength."

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 57:2

    He shall enter into peace - Lowth, 'He shall go in peace.' So the margin. Vulgate, 'Peace shall come.' Septuagint, 'His sepulture (ἡ ταφὴ αὐτοῦ hē taphē autou) shall be in peace.' The idea is, that by his death the righteous man shall enter into rest. He shall get away from conflict, strife, agitation, and distress. This may either refer to the peaceful rest of the grave, or to that which awaits the just in a better world. The direct meaning here intended is probably the former, since the grave is often spoken of as a place of rest. Thus Job JObadiah 3:17, speaking of the grave, says:

    There the wicked cease from troubling; And there the weary be at rest.

    The connection here seems also to demand the same sense, as it is immediately added, 'they shall rest in their beds.' The grave is a place of peace:

    Nor pain, nor grief, nor anxious fear,

    Invade thy bounds; no mortal woes

    Can reach the peaceful sleeper here,

    While angels watch the soft repose.

    - Watts

    At the same time it is true that the dying saint 'goes in peace!' He has calmness in his dying, as well as peace in his grave. He forgives all who have injured him; prays for all who have persecuted him; and peacefully and calmly dies. He lies in a peaceful grave - often represented in the Scriptures as a place of repose, where the righteous 'sleep' in the hope of being awakened in the morning of the resurrection. He enters into the rest of heaven - the world of perfect and eternal repose. No persecution comes there; no trial awaits him there; no calamity shall meet him there. Thus, in all respects, the righteous leave the world in peace; and thus death ceases to be a calamity, and this most dreaded of all evils is turned into the highest blessing.

    They shall rest in their beds - That is, in their graves.

    Each one walking in his uprightness - Margin, 'Before him.' The word נכח nakkoch means "straight, right," and is used of one who walks straight forward. It here means an upright man, who is often represented as walking in a straight path in opposition to sinners, who are represented as walking in crooked ways Psalm 125:5; Proverbs 2:15; Isaiah 59:8; Philippians 2:15. The sense here is, that all who are upright shall leave the world in peace, and rest quietly in their graves.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 57:2

    57:2 He - This just and merciful man shall enter into a state of rest, where he shall be out of the reach of the approaching miseries. They - just men. Here is a sudden change of the number, which is very frequent in the prophets. Beds - In their graves, which are not unfitly called their beds, as their death is commonly called sleep in scripture.