Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Isaiah 62:6

    Isaiah 62:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I have set watchmen upon thy walls, O Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night: ye that make mention of the LORD, keep not silence,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I have set watchmen on your walls, O Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night: you that make mention of the LORD, keep not silence,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I have set watchmen upon thy walls, O Jerusalem; they shall never hold their peace day nor night: ye that are Jehovah's remembrancers, take ye no rest,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I have put watchmen on your walls, O Jerusalem; they will not keep quiet day or night: you who are the Lord's recorders, take no rest,

    Webster's Revision

    I have set watchmen upon thy walls, O Jerusalem; they shall never hold their peace day nor night: ye that are Jehovah's remembrancers, take ye no rest,

    World English Bible

    I have set watchmen on your walls, Jerusalem; they shall never hold their peace day nor night: you who call on Yahweh, take no rest,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I have set watchmen upon thy walls, O Jerusalem; they shall never hold their peace day nor night: ye that are the LORD'S remembrancers, take ye no rest,

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 62:6

    Ye that make mention of the Lord, keep not silence - The faithful, and in particular the priests and Levites, are exhorted by the prophet to beseech God with unremitted importunity (compare Luke 18:1, etc.) to hasten the redemption of Sion. The image in this place is taken from the temple service; in which there was appointed a constant watch, day and night, by the Levites: and among them this seems to have belonged particularly to the singers, see 1 Chronicles 9:33. Now the watches in the east, even to this day, are performed by a loud cry from time to time of the watchmen, to mark the time, and that very frequently, and in order to show that they themselves are constantly attentive to their duty. Hence the watchmen are said by the prophet, Isaiah 52:8, to lift up their voice; and here they are commanded, not to keep silence; and the greatest reproach to them is, that they are dumb dogs; they cannot bark; dreamers; sluggards, loving to slumber, Isaiah 56:10. "The watchmen in the camp of the caravans go their rounds crying one after another, 'God is one, he is merciful:' and often add, 'Take heed to yourselves.'" Tavernier, Voyage de Perse, 54:1 chap. 10. The hundred and thirty-fourth Psalm gives us an example of the temple watch. The whole Psalm is nothing more than the alternate cry of two different divisions of the watch. The first watch addresses the second, reminding them of their duty; the second answers by a solemn blessing. The address and the answer seem both to be a set form, which each division proclaimed, or sung aloud, at stated intervals, to notify the time of the night: -

    First Chorus

    "Come on now, bless ye Jehovah, all ye servants of Jehovah;

    Ye that stand in the house of Jehovah in the nights;

    Lift up your hands towards the sanctuary,

    And bless ye Jehovah."

    Second Chorus

    "Jehovah bless thee out of Sion;

    He that made heaven and earth."

    "Ye who stand in the place of the watch, in the house of the sanctuary of the Lord; and ye praise through the nights;" - says the Chaldee paraphrase on the second line. And this explains what is here particularly meant by proclaiming, or making remembrance of, the name of Jehovah: the form, which the watch made use of on these occasions, was always a short sentence, expressing some pious sentiment, of which Jehovah was the subject; and it is remarkable, that the custom in the east in this respect also still continues the very same; as appears by the example above given from Tavernier.

    And this observation leads to the explanation of an obscure passage in the Prophet Malachi, Malachi 2:12.

    "Jehovah will cut off the man that doeth this;

    The watchman and the answerer, from the tabernacles of Jacob;

    And him that presenteth an offering to Jehovah God of hosts."

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 62:6

    I have set watchmen upon thy walls - (See the notes at Isaiah 21:6-11). The speaker here is undoubtedly Yahweh; and by watchmen he means those whom he had appointed to be the instructors of his people - the ministers of religion. The name 'watchmen' is often given to them (Ezekiel 3:17; Ezekiel 33:7; see the notes at Isaiah 52:8; Isaiah 56:10).

    Which shall never hold their peace - The watches in the East are to this day performed by a loud cry as they go their rounds. This is done frequently in order to mark the time, and also to show that they are awake to their duty. "The watchmen in the camp of the caravans go their rounds, crying one after another, 'God is one; He is merciful'; and often add, 'Take heed to yourselves'" - (Tavernier). The truth here taught is, that they who are appointed to be the ministers of religion should be ever watchful and unceasing in the discharge of their duty.

    Ye that make mention of the Lord - Margin, 'That are the Lord's remembrancers.' These are evidently the words of the prophet addressing those who are watchmen, and urging them to do their duty, as he had said Isaiah 62:1 he was resolved to do his, Lowth renders this, 'O ye that proclaim the name of Yahweh.' Noyes, 'O ye that praise Yahweh.' But this does not express the sense of the original as well as the common version. The Hebrew word המזכירים hamazekiyriym, from זכר zâkar, "to remember") means properly those bringing to remembrance, or causing to remember. It is a word frequently applied to the praise of God, or to the celebration of his worship Psalm 20:7; Psalm 38:1; Psalm 45:17; Psalm 70:1; Psalm 102:12. In such instances the word does not mean that they who are engaged in his service cause Yahweh to remember, or bring things to his recollection which otherwise he would forget; but it means that they would keep up his remembrance among the people, or that they proclaimed his name in order that he might not be forgotten. This is the idea here. It is not merely that they were engaged in the worship of God; but it is, that they did this in order to keep up the remembrance of Yahweh among people. In this sense the ministers of religion are 'the remembrancers' of the Lord.

    Keep not silence - Hebrew, 'Let there be no silence to you.' That is, be constantly employed in public prayer and praise.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 62:6

    62:6 Day nor night - There shall be a vigilant and industrious ministry. Ye - That is, are his servants. And here especially are meant his servants in ordinary, his remembrancers, such as put God in mind of his promise, and such as make the Lord to be remembered, putting his people in mind of him.