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James 2:25

    James 2:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And in like manner was not also Rahab the harlot justified by works, in that she received the messengers, and sent them out another way?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And in the same way, was not the righteousness of Rahab, the loose woman, judged by her works, when she took into her house those who were sent and let them go out by another way?

    Webster's Revision

    And in like manner was not also Rahab the harlot justified by works, in that she received the messengers, and sent them out another way?

    World English Bible

    In the same way, wasn't Rahab the prostitute also justified by works, in that she received the messengers, and sent them out another way?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And in like manner was not also Rahab the harlot justified by works, in that she received the messengers, and sent them out another way?

    Clarke's Commentary on James 2:25

    Rahab the harlot - See the notes on Joshua 2:1, etc., and Hebrews 11:31 (note), etc. Rahab had the approbation due to genuine faith, which she actually possessed, and gave the fullest proof that she did so by her conduct. As justification signifies, not only the pardon of sin, but receiving the Divine approbation, James seems to use the word in this latter sense. God approved of them, because of their obedience to his will; and he approves of no man who is not obedient.

    Barnes' Notes on James 2:25

    Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works? - In the same sense in which Abraham was, as explained above - showing by her act that her faith was genuine, and that it was not a mere cold and speculative assent to the truths of religion. Her act showed that she truly believed God. If that act had not been performed, the fact would have shown that her faith was not genuine, and she could not have been justified. God saw her faith as it was; he saw that it would produce acts of obedience, and he accepted her as righteous. The act which she performed was the public manifestation of her faith, the evidence that she was justified. See the case of Rahab fully explained in the notes at Hebrews 11:31. It may be observed here, that we are not to suppose that everything in the life and character of this woman is commended. She is commended for her faith, and for the fair expression of it; a faith which, as it induced her to receive the messengers of the true God, and to send them forth in peace, and as it led her to identify herself with the people of God, was also influential, we have every reason to suppose, in inducing her to abandon her former course of life. When we commend the faith of a man who has been a profane swearer, or an adulterer, or a robber, or a drunkard, we do not commend his former life, or give a sanction to it. We commend that which has induced him to abandon his evil course, and to turn to the ways of righteousness. The more evil his former course has been, the more wonderful, and the more worthy of commendation, is that faith by which he is reformed and saved.

    Wesley's Notes on James 2:25

    2:25 After Abraham, the father of the Jews, the apostle cites Rahab, a woman, and a sinner of the gentiles; to show, that in every nation and sex true faith produces works, and is perfected by them; that is, by the grace of God working in the believer, while he is showing his faith by his works.