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James 3:7

    James 3:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed of mankind:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and has been tamed of mankind:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For every kind of beasts and birds, of creeping things and things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed by mankind.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For every sort of beast and bird and every living thing on earth and in the sea has been controlled by man and is under his authority;

    Webster's Revision

    For every kind of beasts and birds, of creeping things and things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed by mankind.

    World English Bible

    For every kind of animal, bird, creeping thing, and thing in the sea, is tamed, and has been tamed by mankind.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For every kind of beasts and birds, of creeping things and things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed by mankind:

    Definitions for James 3:7

    Sea - Large basin.

    Clarke's Commentary on James 3:7

    Every kind of beasts - That is, every species of wild beasts, πασα φυσις θηριων, is tamed, i.e. brought under man's power and dominion. Beasts, birds, serpents, and some kinds of fishes have been tamed so as to be domesticated; but every kind, particularly των εναλιων, of sea monsters, has not been thus tamed; but all have been subjected to the power of man; both the shark and whale become an easy prey to the skill and influence of the human being. I have had the most credible information, when in the Zetland Isles, of the seals being domesticated, and of one that would pass part of his time on shore, receive his allowance of milk, etc., from the servants, go again to sea, and return, and so on.

    Barnes' Notes on James 3:7

    For every kind of beasts - The apostle proceeds to state another thing showing the power of the tongue, the fact that it is ungovernable, and that there is no power of man to keep it under control. Everything else but this has been tamed. It is unnecessary to refine on the expressions used here, by attempting to prove that it is literally true that every species of beasts, and birds, and fishes has been tamed. The apostle is to be understood as speaking in a general and popular sense, showing the remarkable power of man over those things which are by nature savage and wild. The power of man in taming wild beasts is wonderful. Indeed, it is to be remembered that nearly all those beasts which we now speak of as "domestic" animals, and which we are accustomed to see only when they are tame, were once fierce and savage races. This is the case with the horse, the ox, the ass, (see the notes at Job 11:12; Job 39:5), the swine, the dog, the cat, etc. The editor of the Pictorial Bible well remarks, "There is perhaps no kind of creature, to which man has access, which might not be tamed by him with proper perseverance. The ancients seem to have made more exertions to this end, and with much better success, than ourselves. The examples given by Pliny, of creatures tamed by men, relate to elephants, lions, and tigers, among beasts; to the eagle, among birds; to asps, and other serpents; and to crocodiles, and various fishes, among the inhabitants of the water. Natural History viii. 9, 16, 17; x. 5, 44. The lion was very commonly tamed by the ancient Egyptians, and trained to assist both in hunting and in war." Notes in loc. The only animal which it has been supposed has defied the power of man to tame it, is the hyena, and even this, it is said, has been subdued, in modern times. There is a passage in Euripides which has a strong resemblance to this of James:

    Βραχὺ τοι σθένος ἀνέρος

    Ἀλλὰ ποικιλίαις πραπίδων

    Δαμᾷ φῦλα πόντου,

    Χθονίων τ ̓ ἀερίων τε παιδεύματα.

    Brachu toi sthenos aneros

    Alla poikiliais prapidōn

    Dama phula pontou,

    Chthoniōn t' aeriōn te paideumata.

    "Small is the power which nature has given to man; but, by various acts of his superior understanding, he has subdued the tribes of the sea, the earth, and the air." Compare on this subject, the passages quoted by Pricaeus in the Critici Sacri, in loc.

    And of birds - It is a common thing to tame birds, and even the most wild are susceptible of being tamed. A portion of the leathered race, as the hen, the goose, the duck, is thoroughly domesticated. The pigeon, the martin, the hawk, the eagle, may be; and perhaps there are none of that race which might not be made subject to the will of man.

    And of serpents - The ancients showed great skill in this art, in reference to asps and other venomous serpents, and it is common now in India. In many instances, indeed, it is known that the fangs of the serpents are extracted; but even when this is not done, they who practice the art learn to handle them with impunity.

    And of things in the sea - As the crocodile mentioned by Pliny. It may be affirmed with confidence that there is no animal which might not, by proper skill and perseverance, be rendered tame, or made obedient to the will of man. It is not necessary, however, to understand the apostle as affirming that literally every animal has been tamed, or ever can be. He evidently speaks in a popular sense of the great power which man undeniably has over all kinds of wild animals - over the creation beneath him.

    Wesley's Notes on James 3:7

    3:7 Every kind - The expression perhaps is not to be taken strictly. Reptiles - That is, creeping things.
    Book: James
    Topic: Animals