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Job 12:6

    Job 12:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The tabernacles of robbers prosper, and they that provoke God are secure; into whose hand God bringeth abundantly.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The tabernacles of robbers prosper, and they that provoke God are secure; into whose hand God brings abundantly.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The tents of robbers prosper, And they that provoke God are secure; Into whose hand God bringeth abundantly .

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    There is wealth in the tents of those who make destruction, and those by whom God is moved to wrath are safe; even those whose god is their strength.

    Webster's Revision

    The tents of robbers prosper, And they that provoke God are secure; Into whose hand God bringeth abundantly .

    World English Bible

    The tents of robbers prosper. Those who provoke God are secure, who carry their God in their hands.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The tents of robbers prosper, and they that provoke God are secure; into whose hand God bringeth abundantly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 12:6

    The tabernacles of robbers prosper - Those who live by the plunder of their neighbors are often found in great secular prosperity; and they that provoke God by impiety and blasphemy live in a state of security and affluence. These are administrations of Providence which cannot be accounted for; yet the Judge of all the earth does right. Therefore prosperity and adversity are no evidences of a man's spiritual state, nor of the place he holds in the approbation or disapprobation of God.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 12:6

    The tabernacles of robbers prosper - The tents or dwellings of robbers are safe and secure. This is Job's original proposition, to which he all along adheres. It is, that God does not deal with people in this life according to their character; and in support of this he now appeals to the fact that the tents or dwellings of robbers are safe. Arabia would furnish many illustrations of this, which could not be unknown to the friends of Job. The Arabs dwelt in tents, and they were then, as now, wandering, predatory tribes. They lived, to a great extent, by plunder, and doubtless Job could appeal to the observation of his friends for the proof of this. He affirms that so far from dealing with people according to their character, God often seemed to protect the public robber, and the blasphemer of his name.

    Prosper - They are secure, tranquil, at rest - for so the Hebrew word means. They are not disturbed and broken in upon.

    And they that provoke God - Or rather, "the tents are secure to those who provoke God." Dr. Good renders it, "and are fortresses to those who provoke God;" but the true idea is, that the tents of those who provoke God by their conduct are safe. God does not seem to notice them, or to come out in judgment against them.

    Into whose hand God bringeth abundantly - Dr. Noyes renders this, "who carry their God in their hand;" but with much less accuracy, as it seems to me, than commonly characterizes his version. Eichhorn renders it in a sense somewhat similar:

    Die ihre Faust fur ihre Gottheit achten -

    "Who regard their fist as their God."

    And so Stuhlman renders it:

    Und wem die Faust fur Gottheit gilt -

    "And to whom the fist avails for their God;"

    That is, says he, Job means that this is the course of the world. Dr. Good renders it, "of him who hath created all these things with his hand" - still less accurately. In order to this, he is obliged to suppose an error in the text, but without the slightest authority. Jerome renders it as in our version. The Septuagint, "who provoke the Lord as if there would be no trial to them - ἔτασις αὐτῶν etasis autōn - here-after;" which certainly makes sense, but it was never obtained from the Hebrew. Rosenmuller renders it, "who have their own hand, that is, power for God;" a description, says he, of a wicked and violent man who thinks it right for him to do as he pleases. It seems to me, however, that the common interpretation, which is the most simple, is most in accordance with the Hebrew, and with the drift of the passage. According to this it means, that there is security to the man who lives to provoke that God who is constantly bringing to him in abundance the tokens of kindness. This is the fact on which Job is insisting - that God does not treat people in this world according to their real character, but that the wicked are prospered and the righteous are afflicted.
    Book: Job