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Job 13:11

    Job 13:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Shall not his excellency make you afraid? and his dread fall upon you?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Shall not his excellency make you afraid? and his dread fall on you?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Shall not his majesty make you afraid, And his dread fall upon you?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Will not his glory put you in fear, so that your hearts will be overcome before him?

    Webster's Revision

    Shall not his majesty make you afraid, And his dread fall upon you?

    World English Bible

    Shall not his majesty make you afraid, And his dread fall on you?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Shall not his excellency make you afraid, and his dread fall upon you?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 13:11

    His dread fall upon you? - The very apprehension of his wrath is sufficient to crush you to nothing.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 13:11

    Shall not his excellency - His exaltation שׂאת śe'êth from נשׂא nâśâ' to exalt, to lift up), or his majesty, Genesis 49:3.

    Make you afraid - Fill you with awe and reverence. Shall it not restrain you from fallacy, from sophisms, and from all presumptuous and unfounded reasoning? The sense here is, that a sense of the greatness and majesty of God should fill the mind with solemnity and reverence, and make us serious and sincere; should repress all declamation and mere assertion, and should lead us to adduce only those considerations which will bear the test of the final trial. The general proposition, however, is not less clear, that a sense of the majesty and glory of God should at all times fill the mind with solemn awe, and produce the deepest veneration. See Jeremiah 5:22; Jeremiah 10:7-10; Genesis 28:17.

    And his dread - The fear of him. You should so stand in awe of him as not to advance any sentiments which he will not approve, or which will not bear the test of examination. Rosenmuller, however, and after him Noyes, supposes that this is not so much a declaration of what ought to be, implying that the fear of God ought to produce veneration, as a declaration of what actually occurred - implying that they were actually influenced by this slavish fear in what they said. According to this it means that they were actuated only by a dread of what God would do to them that led them to condemn. Job without proof, and not by a regard to truth. But the common interpretation seems to me most in accordance with the meaning of the passage.
    Book: Job