Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 13:7

    Job 13:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Will ye speak wickedly for God? and talk deceitfully for him?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Will you speak wickedly for God? and talk deceitfully for him?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Will ye speak unrighteously for God, And talk deceitfully for him?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Will you say in God's name what is not right, and put false words into his mouth?

    Webster's Revision

    Will ye speak unrighteously for God, And talk deceitfully for him?

    World English Bible

    Will you speak unrighteously for God, and talk deceitfully for him?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Will ye speak unrighteously for God, and talk deceitfully for him?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 13:7

    Will ye speak wickedly for God? - In order to support your own cause, in contradiction to the evidence which the whole of my life bears to the uprightness of my heart, will ye continue to assert that God could not thus afflict me, unless flagrant iniquity were found in my ways; for it is on this ground alone that ye pretend to vindicate the providence of God. Thus ye tell lies for God's sake, and thus ye wickedly contend for your Maker.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 13:7

    Will ye speak wickedly for God? - That is, will you maintain unjust principles with a view to honor or to vindicate God? Job refers doubtless to the positions which they had defended in regard to the divine administration - principles which he regarded as unjust, though they had employed them professedly in vindicating God. The sense is, that unjust principles ought not to be advanced to vindicate God. The great cause of truth and justice should always be maintained, and even in attempting to vindicate the divine administration, we ought to make use of no arguments which are not based on that which is right and true. Job means to reproach his friends with having, in their professed vindication of God, advanced sentiments which were at war with truth and justice, and which were full of fallacy and sophistry. And is this never done now? Are sophistical arguments never employed in attempting to vindicate the divine government? Do we never state principles in regard to him which we should esteem to be unjust and dishonorable if applied to man? Do not good people sometimes feel that that government must be defended at all events; and when they can see no reason for the divine dealings, do they not make attempts at vindicating them, which are merely designed to throw dust in the eyes of an opponent, and which are known to be sophistical in their nature? It is wrong to employ a sophistical argument on any subject; and in reasoning on the divine character and dealings, when we come, as we often do, to points which we cannot understand, it is best to confess it. God asks no weak or sophistical argument in his defense; still less can he be pleased with an argument, though in defense of his government, which is based on unjust principles.

    And talk deceitfully for him - Use fallacies and sophisms in attempting to vindicate him. Everything in speaking of God, should be true, pure, and sound. Every argument should be free from any appearance of sophism, and should be such as will bear the test of the most thorough examination. No honor is done to God by sophistical arguments, nor can he be pleased when such arguments are employed even to vindicate and honor his character.
    Book: Job