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Job 2:12

    Job 2:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust on their heads toward heaven.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his robe, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And lifting up their eyes when they were still far off, it did not seem that the man they saw was Job because of the change in him. And they gave way to bitter weeping, with signs of grief, and put dust on their heads.

    Webster's Revision

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his robe, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

    World English Bible

    When they lifted up their eyes from a distance, and didn't recognize him, they raised their voices, and wept; and they each tore his robe, and sprinkled dust on their heads toward the sky.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

    Definitions for Job 2:12

    Mantle - Garment; covering.
    Rent - Divided; broke or tore apart.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 2:12

    They rent every one his mantle - I have already had frequent occasions to point out and illustrate, by quotations from the ancients, the actions that were used in order to express profound grief; such as wrapping themselves in sackcloth, covering the face, strewing dust or ashes upon the head, sitting upon the bare ground, etc., etc.; significant actions which were in use among all nations.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 2:12

    And when they lifted up their eyes afar off - "When they saw him at the distance at which they could formerly recognize him without difficulty, disease had so altered his appearance that at first sight they knew him not" - Noyes.

    They lifted up their voice - This is a common expression in the Scriptures, to denote grief; Genesis 27:38; Genesis 29:11; Judges 2:4; Ruth 1:9; 1 Samuel 24:16, "et soepe al." We learn to suppress the expressions of grief. The ancients gave vent to their sorrows aloud. - They even hired persons to aid them in their lamentations; and it became a professional business of women to devote themselves to the office of making an outcry on occasions of mourning. The same thing prevails in the East at present. Friends sit around the grave of the dead, or go there at different times, and give a long and doleful shriek or howl, as expressive of their grief.

    And they rent every one his mantle - See the notes at Job 1:20.

    And sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven - Another expression of sorrow; compare Lamentations 2:10; Nehemiah 9:1; 1 Samuel 4:12; Joshua 7:6; Ezekiel 27:30. Thc indications of grief here referred to, were such as were common in ancient times. They resemble, in a remarkable manner, the mode in which Achilles gave utterance to his sorrow, when informed of the death of Patroclus. Iliad xviii. 21-27.

    A sudden horror shot through all the chief,

    And wrapp'd his senses in the cloud of grief;

    Cast on the ground, with furious hands he spread

    The scorching ashes o'er his graceful head,

    His purple garments, and his golden hairs,

    Those he deforms with dust, and these he tears:

    On the hard soil his groaning breast he threw,

    And roll'd and grovell'd as to earth he grew.

    Pope

    Thus far the feelings of the three friends were entirely kind, and all that they did was expressive of sympathy for the sufferer.
    Book: Job