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Job 21:33

    Job 21:33 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him, and every man shall draw after him, as there are innumerable before him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet to him, and every man shall draw after him, as there are innumerable before him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him, And all men shall draw after him, As there were innumerable before him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The earth of the valley covering his bones is sweet to him, and all men come after him, as there were unnumbered before him.

    Webster's Revision

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him, And all men shall draw after him, As there were innumerable before him.

    World English Bible

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet to him. All men shall draw after him, as there were innumerable before him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him, and all men shall draw after him, as there were innumerable before him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 21:33

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him - Perhaps there is an allusion here to the Asiatic mode of interment for princes, saints, and nobles: a well-watered valley was chosen for the tomb, where a perpetual spring might be secured. This was intended to be the emblem of a resurrection, or of a future life; and to conceal as much as possible the disgrace of the rotting carcass.

    Every man shall draw after him - There seem to be two allusions intended here:

    1. To death, the common lot of all. Millions have gone before him to the tomb; and כל אדם col adam, all men, shall follow him: all past generations have died, all succeeding generations shall die also.

    2. To pompous funeral processions; multitudes preceding, and multitudes following, the corpse.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 21:33

    The clods of the valley shall be sweet unto him - That is, he shall lie as calmly as others in the grave. The language here is taken from that delusion of which we all partake when we reflect on death. We think of "ourselves" in the grave, and it is almost impossible to divest our minds of the idea, that we shall be conscious there, and be capable of understanding our condition. The idea here is, that the person who was thus buried, might be sensible of the quiet of his abode, and enjoy, in some measure, the honors of the beautiful or splendid tomb, in which he was buried, and the anxious care of his friends. So we "think" of our friends, though we do not often "express" it. The dear child that is placed in the dark vault, or that is covered up in the ground - we feel as if we could not have him there. We insensibly shudder, as if "he" might be conscious of the darkness and chilliness, and "a part" of our trial arises from this delusion. So felt the American savage - expressing the emotions of the heart, which, in other cases, are often concealed. "At the bottom of a grave, the melting snows had left a little water; and the sight of it chilled and saddened his imagination. 'You have no compassion for my poor brother' - such was the reproach of an Algonquin - 'the air is pleasant, and the sun so cheering, and yet you do not remove the snow from the grave, to warm him a little,' and he knew no contentment until it was done." - Bancroft's History, U. S. iii. 294, 295. The same feeling is expressed by Fingal over the grave of Gaul:

    Prepare, ye children of musical strings,

    The bed of Gaul, and his sun-beam by him;

    Where may be seen his resting place from afar

    Which branches high overshadow,

    Under the wing of the oak of greenest flourish,

    Of quickest growth, and most durable form,

    Which will shoot forth its leaves to the breeze of the shower,

    While the heath around is still withered.

    Its leaves, from the extremity of the land,

    Shall be seen by the birds in Summer;

    And each bird shall perch, as it arrives,

    On a sprig of its verdant branch;

    Gaul in this mist shall hear the cheerful note,

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on Job 21:33

    21:33 Valley - Of the grave, which is low and deep like a valley. Sweet - He shall sweetly rest in his grave. Draw - Heb. he shall draw every man after him, into the grave, all that live after him, whether good or bad, shall follow him to the grave, shall die as he did. So he fares no worse herein than all mankind. He is figuratively said to draw them, because they come after him, as if they were drawn by his example.
    Book: Job