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Job 29:6

    Job 29:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    When I washed my steps with butter, and the rock poured me out rivers of oil;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    When I washed my steps with butter, and the rock poured me out rivers of oil;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    When my steps were washed with butter, And the rock poured me out streams of oil!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    When my steps were washed with milk, and rivers of oil were flowing out of the rock for me.

    Webster's Revision

    When my steps were washed with butter, And the rock poured me out streams of oil!

    World English Bible

    when my steps were washed with butter, and the rock poured out streams of oil for me,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    When my steps were washed with butter, and the rock poured me out rivers of oil!

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 29:6



    Job 29:6Washed my steps with butter - See the note on Job 20:17.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 29:6

    When I washed my steps with butter - On the word rendered "butter," see the notes at Isaiah 7:15. It properly means curdled milk. Umbreit renders it, Sahne; cream. Noyes, milk, and so Wemyss. The Septuagint, "When my ways flowed with butter" - βουτύρῳ bouturō. So Coverdale, "When my ways ran over with butter." Herder, "And where I went a stream of milk flowed on." The sense may be, that cream or butter was so plenty that he was able to make use of it for the most common purposes - even for that of washing his feet. That butter was sometimes used for the purpose of anointing the feet - probably for comfort and health - as oil was for the head, is mentioned by Oriental travelers. Hassilquist (Travels in Palestine, p. 58), speaking of the ceremonies of the priests at Magnesia on holy Thursday, says, "The priest washed and dried the feet, and afterward besmeared them with butter, which it was alleged was made from the first milk of a young cow." Bruce says that the king of Abyssinia daily anointed his head with butter. Burder in Rosenmuller's alte u. neue Morgenland, in loc. It is possible that this use of butter was as ancient as the time of Job, and that he here alludes to it, but it seems more probable that the image is designed to denote superfluity or abundance; and that where he trod, streams of milk or cream flowed - so abundant was it round him. The word rendered "steps" הליכם hâlı̂ykam) does not properly denote "the feet" but "the tread, the going, the stepping." This sense corresponds with that of the other member of the parallelism.

    And the rock poured me out rivers of oil - Margin, "with me." The idea is, that the very rock near which he stood, seemed to pour forth oil. Instead of water gushing out, such seemed to be the abundance with which he was blessed, that the very rock poured out a running stream of oil. Oil was of great value among the Orientals. It was used as an article of food, for light, for anointing the body, and as a valuable medicine. To say, then, that one had abundance of oil, was the same as to say that he had ample means of comfort and of luxury. Perhaps by the word "rock" here, there is an allusion to file places where olives grew. It is said that those which produced the best oil grew upon rocky mountains. There may be, also, an allusion to this in Deuteronomy 32:13 : "He made him to suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the flinty rock." Prof. Lee, and some others, however, understand here by the rock, the press where oil was extracted from olives, and which it is supposed was sometimes made of stone.
    Book: Job