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Job 3:24

    Job 3:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For my sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For my sighing comes before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For my sighing cometh before I eat, And my groanings are poured out like water.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In place of my food I have grief, and cries of sorrow come from me like water.

    Webster's Revision

    For my sighing cometh before I eat, And my groanings are poured out like water.

    World English Bible

    For my sighing comes before I eat. My groanings are poured out like water.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For my sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like water.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:24

    For my sighing cometh - Some think that this refers to the ulcerated state of Job's body, mouth, hands, etc. He longed for food, but was not able to lift it to his mouth with his hands, nor masticate it when brought thither. This is the sense in which Origen has taken the words. But perhaps it is most natural to suppose that he means his sighing took away all appetite, and served him in place of meat. There is the same thought in Psalm 42:3 : My tears have been my meat day and night; which place is not an imitation of Job, but more likely Job an imitation of it, or, rather, both an imitation of nature.

    My roarings are poured out - My lamentations are like the noise of the murmuring stream, or the dashings of the overswollen torrent.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:24

    For my sighing cometh before I eat - Margin, "My meat." Dr. Good renders this," Behold! my sighing takes the place of my daily food, and refers to Psalm 42:3, as an illustration:

    My tears are my meat day and night.

    So substantially Schultens renders it, and explains it as meaning, "My sighing comes in the manner of my food," "Suspirium ad modum panis veniens" - and supposes it to mean that his sighs and groans were like his daily food; or were constant and unceasing. Dr. Noyes explains it as meaning, "My sighing comes on when I begin to eat, and prevents my taking my daily nourishment;" and appeals to a similar expression in Juvenal. Sat. xiii. 211:

    Perpetua anxietas, nec mensae tempore cessat.

    Rosenmuller gives substantially the same explanation, and remarks, also, that some suppose that the mouth, hands, and tongue of Job were so affected with disease, that the effort to eat increased his sufferings, and brought on a renewal of his sorrows. The same view is given by Origen; and this is probably the correct sense.

    And my roarings - My deep and heavy groans.

    Are poured out like the waters - That is,

    (1) "in number" - they were like rolling billows, or like the heaving deep.

    (2) Perhaps also in "sound" like them. His groans were like the troubled ocean, that can be heard afar. Perhaps, also,

    (3.) he means to say that his groans were attended with "a flood of tears," or that his tears were like the waves of the sea.

    There is some hyperbole in the figure, in whichever way it is understood; but we are to remember that his feelings were deeply excited, and that the Orientals were in the habit of expressing themselves in a mode, which to us, of more phlegmatic temperament, may seem extravagant in the extreme. We have, however, a similar expression when we say of one that "he burst into a "flood of tears.""

    Wesley's Notes on Job 3:24

    3:24 Before, and c. - Heb. before the face of my bread, all the time I am eating, I fall into sighing and weeping, because I am obliged to eat, and to support this wretched life, and because of my uninterrupted pains of body and of mind, which do not afford me one quiet moment. Roarings - My loud outcries, more befitting a lion than a man. Poured out - With great abundance, and irresistible violence, and incessant continuance, as waters flow in a river, or as they break the banks, and overflow the ground.
    Book: Job