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Job 3:9

    Job 3:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark; let it look for light, but have none; neither let it see the dawning of the day:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark; let it look for light, but have none; neither let it see the dawning of the day:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark: Let it look for light, but have none; Neither let it behold the eyelids of the morning:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let its morning stars be dark; let it be looking for light, but may it not have any; let it not see the eyes of the dawn.

    Webster's Revision

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark: Let it look for light, but have none; Neither let it behold the eyelids of the morning:

    World English Bible

    Let the stars of its twilight be dark. Let it look for light, but have none, neither let it see the eyelids of the morning,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark: let it look for light, but have none; neither let it behold the eyelids of the morning:

    Definitions for Job 3:9

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:9

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof - The stars of the twilight may here refer to the planets Venus, Jupiter, Mars, and Mercury, as well as to the brighter fixed stars.

    Let it look for light - Here the prosopopoeia or personification is still carried on. The darkness is represented as waiting for the lustre of the evening star, but is disappointed; and these for the aurora or dawn, but equally in vain. He had prayed that its light, the sun, should not shine upon it, Job 3:4; and here he prays that its evening star may be totally obscured, and that it might never see the dawning of the day. Thus his execration comprehends every thing that might irradiate or enliven it.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:9

    Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark - That is, be extinguished, so that it shall be total darkness - darkness not even relieved by a single star. The word here rendered "twilight" נשׁף nesheph means properly a breathing; and hence, the evening, when cooling breezes "blow," or gently breathe. It is used however, to denote both the morning and the evening twilight, though here probably it means the latter. He wishes that the evening of that night, instead of being in any way illuminated, should "set in" with total darkness and continue so. The Septuagint renders it, "night.

    Let it look for light, but have none - Personifying the night, and representing it as looking out anxiously for some ray of light. This is a beautiful poetic image - the image of "Night," dark and gloomy and sad, anxiously looking out for a single beam or a star to break in upon its darkness and diminish its gloom.

    Neither let it see the dawning of the day - Margin, more literally and more beautifully, "eyelids of the morning." The word rendered "dawning" עפעפים ‛aph‛aphı̂ym means properly "the eyelashes" (from עוּף ‛ûph "to fly"), and it is given to them from their flying or fluttering. The word rendered "day" שׁחר shachar means the aurora, the morning. The sun when he is above the horizon is called by the poets the eye of day; and hence, his earliest beams, before he is risen, are called the eyelids or eyelashes of the morning opening upon the world. This figure is common in the ancient Classics, and occurs frequently in the Arabic poets; see Schultens "in loc." Thus, in Soph. Antiq. 104, the phrase occurs, Ἁμέρας βλέφυρον Hameras blefaron. So in Milton's Lycidas,

    " - Ere the high lawns appeared

    Under the opening eyelids of the dawn,

    We drive afield."

    Job's wish was, that there might be no star in the evening twilight, and that no ray might illuminate that of the morning; that it might be enveloped in perpetual, unbroken darkness.
    Book: Job