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Job 31:3

    Job 31:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Is not destruction to the wicked? and a strange punishment to the workers of iniquity?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Is not destruction to the wicked? and a strange punishment to the workers of iniquity?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Is it not calamity to the unrighteous, And disaster to the workers of iniquity?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Is it not trouble for the sinner, and destruction for the evil-doers?

    Webster's Revision

    Is it not calamity to the unrighteous, And disaster to the workers of iniquity?

    World English Bible

    Is it not calamity to the unrighteous, and disaster to the workers of iniquity?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Is it not calamity to the unrighteous, and disaster to the workers of iniquity?

    Definitions for Job 31:3

    Iniquity - Sin; wickedness; evil.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 31:3

    Is not destruction to the wicked - If I had been guilty of such secret hypocritical proceedings, professing faith in the true God while in eye and heart an idolater, would not such a worker of iniquity be distinguished by a strange and unheard-of punishment?

    Barnes' Notes on Job 31:3

    Is not destruction to the wicked? - That is, Job says that he was well aware that destruction would overtake the wicked, and that if he had given indulgence to impure desires he could have looked for nothing else. Well knowing this, he says, he had guarded himself in the most careful manner from sin, and had labored with the greatest assiduity to keep his eyes and his heart pure.

    And a strange punishment - - ונכר weneker. The word used here, means literally strangeness - a strange thing, something with which we were unacquainted. It is used here evidently in the sense of a strange or unusual punishment; something which does not occur in the ordinary course of events. The sense is, that for the sin here particularly referred to, God would interpose to inflict vengeance in a manner such as did not occur in the ordinary dealings of his providence. There would be some punishment adopted especially to this sin, and which would mark it with his special displeasure. Has it not been so in all ages? The Vulgate renders it, alienatio, and the Septuagint translates it in a similar manner - ἀπαλλοτρίωσις apallotriōsis - and they seem to have understood it as followed by entire alienation from God; an idea which would be every where sustained by a reference to the history of the sin referred to by Job. There is no sin that so much poisons all the fountains of pure feeling in the soul, and none that will so certainly terminate in the entire wreck of character.
    Book: Job