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Job 35:9

    Job 35:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they make the oppressed to cry: they cry out by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they make the oppressed to cry: they cry out by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they cry out; They cry for help by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because the hand of the cruel is hard on them, men are making sounds of grief; they are crying out for help because of the arm of the strong.

    Webster's Revision

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they cry out; They cry for help by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    World English Bible

    "By reason of the multitude of oppressions they cry out. They cry for help by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they cry out; they cry for help by reason of the arm of the mighty.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:9

    By reason of the multitude - Or rather, "From among the multitude" the oppressed clamor, יזעיקו yaziku: they shout, ישועו yeshavveu, because of the mighty. The wicked rich oppress the wicked poor; these cry aloud because of their oppressors; but they have no relief, because they call not upon God.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:9

    By reason of the multitude of oppressions they make the oppressed to cry - It is not quite easy to see the connection which this verse has with what goes before, or its bearing on the argument of Elihu. It seems however, to refer to the "oppressed in general," and to the fact, to which Job had himself adverted Job 24:12, that people are borne down by oppression and that God does not interpose to save them. They are suffered to remain in that state of oppression - trodden down by people, crushed by the armor of a despot, and overwhelmed with poverty, sorrow, and want, and God does not interpose to rescue them. He looks on and sees all this evil, and does not come forth to deliver those who thus suffer. This is a common case, according to the view of Job; this was his own case, and he could not explain it, and in view of it he had indulged in language which Elihu regarded as a severe reflection on the government of the Almighty. He undertakes, therefore, to "explain the reason" why people are permitted thus to suffer, and why they are not relieved.

    In the verse before us, he states "the fact," that multitudes "do" thus suffer under the arm of oppression - for that fact could not be denied; in the following verses, he states "the reason" why it is so, and that reason is, that they do not apply in any proper manner to God, who could "give songs in the night," or joy in the midst of calamities, and who could make them acquainted with the nature of his government as intelligent beings, so that they would be able to understand it and acquiesce in it. The phrase "the multitude of oppressions" refers to the numerous and repeated calamities which tyrants bring upon the poor, the down-trodden, and the slave. The phrases "to cry" and "they cry out," refer to the lamentations and sighs of those under the arm of the oppressor. Elihu did not dispute the truth of "the fact" as it was alleged by Job. That fact could not then be doubted any more than it can now, that there were many who were bowed down under burdens imposed by hard-hearted masters, and groaning under the government of tyrants, and that all this was seen and permitted by a holy God. This fact troubled Job - for he was one of this general class of sufferers; and this fact Elihu proposes to account for. Whether his solution is satisfactory, however, may still admit of a doubt.
    Book: Job