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Job 37:19

    Job 37:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Teach us what we shall say unto him; for we cannot order our speech by reason of darkness.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Teach us what we shall say to him; for we cannot order our speech by reason of darkness.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Teach us what we shall say unto him; For we cannot set our speech in order by reason of darkness.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Make clear to me what we are to say to him; we are unable to put our cause before him, because of the dark.

    Webster's Revision

    Teach us what we shall say unto him; For we cannot set our speech in order by reason of darkness.

    World English Bible

    Teach us what we shall tell him, for we can't make our case by reason of darkness.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Teach us what we shall say unto him; for we cannot order our speech by reason of darkness.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 37:19

    Teach us what we shall say unto him? - Thou pretendest to be so very wise, and to know every thing about God, pray make us as wise as thyself, that we may be able to approach with thy boldness the Sovereign of the world; and maintain our cause with thy confidence before him. As for our parts, we are ignorant; and, on all these subjects, are enveloped with darkness. Mr. Good translates: -

    "Teach us how we may address him,

    When arrayed in robes of darkness."

    It is a strong and biting irony, however we take it.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 37:19

    Teach us what we shall say unto him - This seems to be addressed to Job. It is the language of Elihu, implying that he was overawed with a sense of the majesty and glory of such a God. He knew not in what manner, or with what words to approach such a Being, and he asks Job to inform him, if he knew.

    We cannot order our speech by reason of darkness - Job had repeatedly professed a desire to bring his cause directly before God, and to argue it in his presence. He felt assured that if he could do that, he should be able so to present it as to obtain a decision in his favor; see Job 13:3, note; Job 13:18-22, notes. Elihu now designs, indirectly, to censure that confidence. He says that he and his friends were so overawed by the majesty of God, and felt themselves so ignorant and so ill qualified to judge of him and his works, that they would not know what to say. They were in darkness. They could not understand even the works of his hands which were directly before them, and the most common operations of nature were inscrutable to them. How then could they presume to arraign God? How could they manage a cause before him with any hope of success? It is scarcely necessary to say, that the state of mind referred to here by Elihu is that which should be cultivated, and that the feelings which he expresses are those with which we should approach the Creator. We need someone to teach us. We are surrounded by mysteries which we cannot comprehend, and we should, therefore, approach our Maker with profound reverence and submission
    Book: Job