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Job 37:2

    Job 37:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Hear attentively the noise of his voice, and the sound that goeth out of his mouth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Hear attentively the noise of his voice, and the sound that goes out of his mouth.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Hear, oh, hear the noise of his voice, And the sound that goeth out of his mouth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Give ear to the rolling noise of his voice; to the hollow sound which goes out of his mouth.

    Webster's Revision

    Hear, oh, hear the noise of his voice, And the sound that goeth out of his mouth.

    World English Bible

    Hear, oh, hear the noise of his voice, the sound that goes out of his mouth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Hearken ye unto the noise of his voice, and the sound that goeth out of his mouth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 37:2

    Hear attentively - "Hear with hearing." The words seem to intimate that there was actually at that time a violent storm of thunder and lightning, and that the successive peals were now breaking over the house, and the lightning flashing before their eyes. The storm continued till Elihu had finished, and out of that storm the Almighty spoke. See the beginning of the succeeding chapter, Job 38 (note).

    The noise of his voice - The sudden clap.

    And the sound that goeth out - The peal or continued rattling, pounding, and thumping, to the end of the peal. The whole is represented as the voice of God himself, and the thunder is immediately issuing from his mouth.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 37:2

    Hear attentively - Margin, as in Hebrew "hear in hearing;" that is, bear with attention. It has been supposed by many, and not without probability, that the tempest was already seen rising, out of which God was to address Job JObadiah 38, and that Elihu here calls the special attention of his hearers to the gathering storm, and to the low muttering thunder in the distance.

    The noise of his voice - Thunder is often represented as the voice of God, and this was one of the most natural of all suppositions when its nature was little understood, and is at all times a beautiful poetic conception; see the whole of Psalm 29:1-11. The word rendered "noise" (רגז rôgez), means properly "commotion," that which is fitted to produce perturbation, or disquiet (see Job 3:17, Job 3:26; Isaiah 14:3), and is used here to denote the commotion, or "raging" of thunder.

    And the sound - The word used here (הגה hegeh) means properly a "muttering growling" - as of thunder. It is often used to denote sighing, moaning, and meditation, in contradistinction from clear enunciation. Here it refers to the thunder which seems to mutter or growl in the sky.
    Book: Job