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Job 40:8

    Job 40:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Will you also cancel my judgment? will you condemn me, that you may be righteous?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wilt thou even annul my judgment? Wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be justified?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Will you even make my right of no value? will you say that I am wrong in order to make clear that you are right?

    Webster's Revision

    Wilt thou even annul my judgment? Wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be justified?

    World English Bible

    Will you even annul my judgment? Will you condemn me, that you may be justified?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wilt thou even disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be justified?

    Definitions for Job 40:8

    Disannul - To abolish a vow; to break.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 40:8

    Wilt thou condemn me - Rather than submit to be thought in the wrong, wilt thou condemn My conduct, in order to justify thyself? Some men will never acknowledge themselves in the wrong. "God may err, but we cannot," seems to be their impious maxim. Unwillingness to acknowledge a fault frequently leads men, directly or indirectly, to this sort of blasphemy. There are three words most difficult to be pronounced in all languages, - I Am Wrong.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 40:8

    Wilt thou disannul my judgment? - Wilt thou "reverse" the judgment which I have formed, and show that it should have been different from what it is? This was implied in what Job had undertaken. He had complained of the dealings of God, and this was the same as saying that he could show that those dealings should have been different from what they were. When a man complains against God, it is always implied that he supposes he could show why his dealings should be different from what they are, and that they should be reversed.

    Wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous? - Or, rather, probably, "Wilt thou show that I am wrong because thou art superior in justice?" Job had allowed himself to use language which strongly implied that God was improperly severe. He had regarded himself as punished far beyond what he deserved, and as suffering in a manner which justice did not demand. All this implied that "he" was more righteous in the case than God, for when a man allows himself to vent such complaints, it indicates that he esteems himself to be more just than his Maker. God now calls upon Job to maintain this proposition, since he had advanced it, and to urge the arguments which would prove that "he" was more righteous in the case than God. It was proper to demand this. It was a charge of such a nature that it could not be passed over in silence, and God asks, therefore, with emphasis, whether Job now supposed that he could institute such an argument as to show that he was right and his Maker wrong.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 40:8

    40:8 Wilt thou - Every word is emphatical, wilt (art thou resolved upon it) thou (thou Job, whom I took to be one of a better mind) also (not only vindicate thyself, but also accuse me) disannul (not only question, but even repeal and make void, as if it were unjust) my judgment? My sentence against thee, and my government and administration of human affairs? Wilt thou make me unrighteous that thou mayst seem to be righteous?
    Book: Job