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Job 41:13

    Job 41:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Who can strip off his outer garment? Who shall come within his jaws?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who has ever taken off his outer skin? who may come inside his inner coat of iron?

    Webster's Revision

    Who can strip off his outer garment? Who shall come within his jaws?

    World English Bible

    Who can strip off his outer garment? Who shall come within his jaws?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Who can strip off his outer garment? who shall come within his double bridle?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 41:13

    Who can discover the face of his garment? - Who can rip up the hide of this terrible monster? Who can take away his covering, in order to pierce his vitals?

    Barnes' Notes on Job 41:13

    Who can discern the face of his garment? - literally, "Who can reveal the face, that is, the appearance, of his garment?" This "garment" is undoubtedly his skin. The meaning seems to be, "His hard and rough skin is his defense, and no one can so strip off that as to have access to him." The word rendered "discover" (גלה gâlâh) means "to make naked"; then "to reveal"; and the idea is, that he cannot be made naked of that covering, or deprived of it so that one could attack him.

    Or who can come to him with his double bridle? - Margin, "within" Gesenius renders this, "The doubling of his jaws;" that is. his double row of teeth. Umbreit, "His double bit." Noyes, "Who will approach his jaws?" So Rosenmuller. Schultens and Prof. Lee, however, suppose it means that no one can come near to him and "double the bit" upon him, "i. e." cast the bit or noose over his nose, so as to secure him by doubling it, or passing it around him. The former seems to me to be the true meaning. "Into the doubling of his jaws, who can enter?" That is, Who will dare approach a double row of teeth so formidable?" The word rendered "bridle" (רסן resen) means properly a curb or halter, which goes over a horse's nose, and hence, a bit or bridle. But it may be used to denote the interior of the mouth, the jaws, where the bit is placed, and then the phrase denotes the double row of teeth of the animal. Thus, the description of the "parts of defense" of the animal is kept up.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 41:13

    41:13 Discover - Or, uncover, or take off from him. Face - The upper or outward part of his garment, or, the garment itself: the word face being often redundant. And by the garment is meant the skin which covers the whole body; who dare attempt to touch his very skin? Much less to give him a wound. His double bridle - His fast jaws, which have some resemblance to a double bridle: whence the Greeks call those parts of the face which reach to the jaws on both sides, the bridles.
    Book: Job