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Job 42:16

    Job 42:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    After this lived Job an hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    After this lived Job an hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And after this Job lived a hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons'sons, even four generations.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And after this Job had a hundred and forty years of life, and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations.

    Webster's Revision

    And after this Job lived a hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons'sons, even four generations.

    World English Bible

    After this Job lived one hundred forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, to four generations.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And after this Job lived an hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 42:16

    After this lived Job a hundred and forty years - How long he had lived before his afflictions, we cannot tell. If we could rely on the Septuagint, all would be plain, who add here, Τα δε παντα ετη εζησεν, διακοσια τεσσαρακοντα; "And all the years that Job 54ed were two hundred and forty." This makes him one hundred years of age when his trial commenced. Coverdale has, After this lyved Job forty yeares, omitting the hundred. So also in Becke's Bible, 1549. From the age, as marked down in the Hebrew text, we can infer nothing relative to the time when Job 54ed. See the subscription at the end of the Arabic.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 42:16

    After this Job 54ed an hundred and forty years - As his age at the time his calamities commenced is not mentioned, it is of course impossible to determine how old he was when he died. The Septuagint, however, has undertaken to determine this, but on what authority is unknown. They render this verse, "And Job 54ed after this affliction an hundred and seventy years: so that all the years that he lived were two hundred and forty." According to this, his age would have been seventy when his afflictions came upon him; but this is a mere conjecture. Why the authors of that version have added thirty years to the time which he lived after his calamities, making it an hundred and seventy instead of an hundred and forty as it is in the Hebrew text, is unknown. The supposition that he was about seventy years of age when his calamities came upon him, is not an unreasonable one.

    He had a family of ten children, and his sons were grown so as to have families of their own, Job 1:4. It should be remembered, also, that in the patriarchal times, when people lived to a great age, marriages did not occur at so early a period of life as they do now. In this book, also, though the age of Job is not mentioned, yet the uniform representation of him is that of a man of mature years; of large experience and extended observation; of one who had enjoyed high honor and a wide reputation as a sage and a magistrate; and when these circumstances are taken into the account, the supposition of the translators of the Septuagint, that he was seventy years old when his afflictions commenced, is not improbable. If so, his age at his death was two hundred and ten years. The age to which he lived is mentioned as remarkable, and was evidently somewhat extraordinary. It is not proper, therefore, to assume that this was the ordinary length of human life at that time, though it would be equally improper to suppose that there was anything like miracle in the case.

    The fair interpretation is, that he reached the period of old age which was then deemed most honorable; that he was permitted to arrive at what was then regarded as the outer limit of human life; and if this be so, it is not difficult to determine "about" the time when he lived. The length of human life, after the flood, suffered a somewhat regular decline, until, in the time of Moses, it was fixed at about threescore years and ten, Psalm 90:10. The following instances will show the regularity of the decline, and enable us, with some degree of probability, to determine the period of the world in which Job 54ed. Noah lived 950 years; Shem, his son, 600; Arphaxad, his son, 438 years; Salah, 433 years; Eber, 464; Peleg, 239; Reu, 239; Serug, 230; Nahor, 248; Terah, 205; Abraham, 175; Isaac, 180; Jacob, 147; Joseph, 110; Moses, 120; Joshua, 110. Supposing, then, the age of Job to have been somewhat unusual and extraordinary, it would fall in with the period somewhere in the time between Terah and Jacob; and if so, he was probably contemporary with the most distinguished of the patriarchs.

    And saw his sons,... - To see one's posterity advancing in years and honor, and extending themselves in the earth, was regarded as a signal honor and a proof of the divine favor in the early ages. Genesis 48:11, "and Israel said unto Joseph, I had not thought to see thy face; and lo, God hath also showed me thy seed." Proverbs 17:6, "children's children are the crown of old men." Psalm 128:6, "yea, thou shalt see thy children's children;" compare Psalm 127:5; Genesis 12:2; Genesis 17:5-6; Job 5:25; and the notes at Isaiah 53:10.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 42:16

    42:16 After this, and c. - Some conjecture, that he was seventy when his trouble came. If so his age was doubled, as his other possessions.
    Book: Job