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Job 6:9

    Job 6:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Even that it would please God to destroy me; that he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Even that it would please God to destroy me; that he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Even that it would please God to crush me; That he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If only he would be pleased to put an end to me; and would let loose his hand, so that I might be cut off!

    Webster's Revision

    Even that it would please God to crush me; That he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    World English Bible

    even that it would please God to crush me; that he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Even that it would please God to crush me; that he would let loose his hand, and cut me off!

    Definitions for Job 6:9

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 6:9

    Let loose his hand - A metaphor taken from an archer drawing his arrow to the head, and then loosing his hold, that the arrow may fly to the mark. See on Job 6:4 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Job 6:9

    Even that it would please God to destroy me - To put me to death, and to release me from my sorrows; compare Job 3:20-21. The word rendered "destroy" here (דכא dâkâ') means properly to break in pieces, to crush, to trample under foot, to make small by bruising. Here the sense is, that Job wished that God would crush him, so as to take his life. The Septuagint renders it "wound" - τρωσάτω trōsatō. The Chaldee renders it, "Let God, who has begun to make me poor, loose his hand and make me rich."

    That he would let loose his hand - Job here represents the hand of God as bound or confined. He wishes that that fettered hand were released, and were so free in its inflictions that he might be permitted to die.

    And cut me off - This expression, says Gesenius (Lexicon on the word בצע betsa‛), is a metaphor derived from a weaver, who, when his web is finished, cuts it off from the thrum by which it is fastened to the loom; see the notes at Isaiah 38:12. The sense is, that Job wished that God would wholly finish his work, and that as he had begun to destroy him he would complete it.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 6:9

    6:9 Destroy - To end my days and calamities together.
    Book: Job